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dc.contributor.authorMikolai, Julia
dc.contributor.authorKeenan, Katherine Lisa
dc.contributor.authorKulu, Hill
dc.date.accessioned2020-05-20T12:30:07Z
dc.date.available2020-05-20T12:30:07Z
dc.date.issued2020-05-10
dc.identifier.citationMikolai , J , Keenan , K L & Kulu , H 2020 ' Household level health and socio-economic vulnerabilities and the COVID-19 crisis : an analysis from the UK ' SocArXiv . https://doi.org/10.31235/osf.io/4wtz8en
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 268058572
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: 4dc0f422-ea86-4abd-9ba1-efe5a4ec9cfe
dc.identifier.otherORCID: /0000-0002-7733-6659/work/74510367
dc.identifier.otherORCID: /0000-0002-9670-1607/work/74510390
dc.identifier.otherORCID: /0000-0001-8808-0719/work/75997004
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10023/19971
dc.description.abstractObjectives. To investigate how COVID-19-related health and socio-economic vulnerabilities occur at the household level, and how they are distributed across household types and geographical areas in the United Kingdom. Design. Cross-sectional, nationally representative study. Setting. The United Kingdom. Participants. ~19,500 households. Main outcome measures. Using multiple household-level indicators and principal components analysis, we derive summary measures representing different dimensions of household vulnerabilities critical during the COVID-19 epidemic: health, employment, housing, financial and digital. Results. Our analysis highlights three key findings. First, although COVID-19 health risks are concentrated in retirement-age households, a substantial proportion of working age households also face these risks. Second, different types of households exhibit different vulnerabilities, with working-age households more likely to face financial, housing and employment precarities, and retirement-age households health and digital vulnerabilities. Third, there are area-level differences in the distribution of vulnerabilities across England and the constituent countries of the United Kingdom. Conclusions. The findings imply that the short- and long-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis are likely to vary by household type. Policy measures that aim to mitigate the health and socio-economic consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic should consider how vulnerabilities cluster together across different household types, and how these may exacerbate already existing inequalities.
dc.format.extent14
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherSocArXiv
dc.rightsCopyright © 2020 The Author(s). This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.en
dc.subjectH Social Sciences (General)en
dc.subjectHM Sociologyen
dc.subjectRA0421 Public health. Hygiene. Preventive Medicineen
dc.subjectSDG 3 - Good Health and Well-beingen
dc.subject.lccH1en
dc.subject.lccHMen
dc.subject.lccRA0421en
dc.titleHousehold level health and socio-economic vulnerabilities and the COVID-19 crisis : an analysis from the UKen
dc.typeWorking or discussion paperen
dc.description.versionPublisher PDFen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews. School of Geography & Sustainable Developmenten
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews. Sir James Mackenzie Institute for Early Diagnosisen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.31235/osf.io/4wtz8


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