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dc.contributor.editorBall, Kirstie
dc.contributor.editorWebster, William
dc.date.accessioned2020-05-18T14:30:02Z
dc.date.available2020-05-18T14:30:02Z
dc.date.issued2020-05-14
dc.identifier.citationBall , K & Webster , W (eds) 2020 , ' Big Data and surveillance : hype, commercial logics and new intimate spheres ' , Big Data & Society , vol. 7 , no. 1 . https://doi.org/10.1177/2053951720925853en
dc.identifier.issn2053-9517
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 268007080
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: 7eed658a-3920-40f7-a164-248a23f223f9
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 85084814871
dc.identifier.otherWOS: 000535924900001
dc.identifier.otherORCID: /0000-0001-6936-7490/work/82179696
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10023/19959
dc.description.abstractBig Data Analytics promises to help companies and public sector service providers anticipate consumer and service user behaviours so that they can be targeted in greater depth. The attempts made by these organisations to connect analytically with users raise questions about whether surveillance, and its associated ethical and rights-based concerns, are intensified. The articles in this special themed issue explore this question from both organisational and user perspectives. They highlight the hype which firms use to drive consumer, employee and service user engagement with analytics within both private and public spaces. Further, they explore extent to which, through Big Data, there is an attempt to expand surveillance into the emotional registers of domestic, embodied experience. Collectively, the papers reveal a fascinating nexus between the much-vaunted potential of analytics, the data practices themselves and the newly configured intimate spheres which have been drawn into the commercial value chain. Together, they highlight the need for conceptual and regulatory innovation so that analytics in practice may be better understood and critiqued. Whilst there is now a rich variety of scholarship on Big Data Analytics, critical perspectives on the organising practices of Big Data Analytics and its surveillance implications are thin on the ground. Combined, the articles published in this special theme begin to address this shortcoming.
dc.format.extent5
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofBig Data & Societyen
dc.rightsCopyright © The Author(s) 2020. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/) which permits non-commercial use, reproduction and distribution of the work without further permission provided the original work is attributed as specified on the SAGE and Open Access pages (https://us.sagepub.com/en-us/nam/open-access-at-sage).en
dc.subjectSuveillanceen
dc.subjectOrganisational contexten
dc.subjectIntimate spheresen
dc.subjectBig Data Analyticsen
dc.subjectCommercial logicsen
dc.subjectInformation trajectoryen
dc.subjectHD28 Management. Industrial Managementen
dc.subject.lccHD28en
dc.titleBig Data and surveillance : hype, commercial logics and new intimate spheresen
dc.typeJournal itemen
dc.description.versionPublisher PDFen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews.School of Managementen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1177/2053951720925853
dc.description.statusNon peer revieweden


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