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dc.contributor.authorTello-Ramos, Maria Cristina
dc.contributor.authorHurly, T. Andrew
dc.contributor.authorHealy, Susan D.
dc.date.accessioned2020-03-24T00:33:06Z
dc.date.available2020-03-24T00:33:06Z
dc.date.issued2019-03-24
dc.identifier.citationTello-Ramos , M C , Hurly , T A & Healy , S D 2019 , ' From a sequential pattern, temporal adjustments emerge in hummingbird traplining ' , Integrative Zoology , vol. 14 , no. 2 , pp. 182-192 . https://doi.org/10.1111/1749-4877.12370en
dc.identifier.issn1749-4877
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 257337988
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: 7b14e042-1fd8-4b5c-83e2-a8cde3551426
dc.identifier.otherRIS: urn:B9782E711B3FD25BA56CDC48E91CDD2D
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 85063284593
dc.identifier.otherORCID: /0000-0002-8059-4480/work/60631328
dc.identifier.otherWOS: 000462130200006
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10023/19698
dc.description.abstractAnimals that feed from resources that are constant in space and that refill may benefit from repeating the order in which they visit locations. This is a behavior known as traplining, a spatial phenomenon. Hummingbirds, like other central‐place foragers, use short traplines when moving between several rewarding sites. Here we investigated whether traplining hummingbirds also use relevant temporal information when choosing which flowers to visit. Wild rufous hummingbirds that were allowed to visit 3 artificial flower patches in which flowers were refilled 20 min after they had been depleted repeated the order in which they visited the 3 patches. Although they tended to visit the first 2 patches sooner than 20 min, they visited the third patch at approximately 20‐min intervals. The time between visits to the patches increased across the experiment, suggesting that the birds learned to wait longer before visiting a patch. The birds appeared to couple the sequential pattern of a trapline with temporal regularity, to some degree. This suggests that there is a temporal component to the repeated spatial movements flown by foraging wild hummingbirds.
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofIntegrative Zoologyen
dc.rights© 2018 International Society of Zoological Sciences, Institute of Zoology/Chinese Academy of Sciences and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd. This work has been made available online in accordance with the publisher's policies. This is the author created accepted version manuscript following peer review and as such may differ slightly from the final published version. The final published version of this work is available at https://doi.org/10.1111/1749-4877.12370en
dc.subjectForaging patternsen
dc.subjectInterval timingen
dc.subjectRufous hummingbirdsen
dc.subjectSelasphorus rufusen
dc.subjectQH301 Biologyen
dc.subjectQL Zoologyen
dc.subjectNDASen
dc.subject.lccQH301en
dc.subject.lccQLen
dc.titleFrom a sequential pattern, temporal adjustments emerge in hummingbird trapliningen
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.description.versionPostprinten
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews.School of Biologyen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews.Centre for Biological Diversityen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews.Institute of Behavioural and Neural Sciencesen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews.Centre for Social Learning & Cognitive Evolutionen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1111/1749-4877.12370
dc.description.statusPeer revieweden
dc.date.embargoedUntil2020-03-24


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