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dc.contributor.authorWard, Ashley J. W.
dc.contributor.authorWebster, Michael M.
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-24T14:30:05Z
dc.date.available2019-10-24T14:30:05Z
dc.date.issued2019-10-02
dc.identifier261744844
dc.identifier91639d54-2fb5-4bf7-af8f-12c06c5c4f94
dc.identifier85072778316
dc.identifier31573425
dc.identifier000504838100001
dc.identifier.citationWard , A J W & Webster , M M 2019 , ' Mid-sized groups perform best in a collective decision task in sticklebacks ' , Biology Letters , vol. 15 , no. 10 , 20190335 . https://doi.org/10.1098/rsbl.2019.0335en
dc.identifier.issn1744-9561
dc.identifier.otherORCID: /0000-0001-9597-6871/work/63046298
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10023/18757
dc.descriptionThis study was supported by Australian Research Council (grant no. DP160103905).en
dc.description.abstractNumerous studies have reported functional improvements in collective behaviour with increasing group size, however, the possibility that such improvements may saturate or even decline as group size continues to grow have seldom been tested experimentally. Here, we tested the ability of solitary three-spined sticklebacks and those in groups, ranging from 2 to 29 fish, to leave an unfavourable patch of habitat. Our results replicate the findings of previous studies at low group sizes, with the fish initially showing a reduction in their latency to leave the unfavourable habitat as group size increased. As group size continued to increase, however, latency to leave the habitat increased, so that the functional relationship between group size and latency to depart was U-shaped. Our results suggest an optimum group size in this context of between 12 and 20 fish. Underlying this group-level trend was a similar U-shaped relationship between group size and the first fish to leave the habitat, suggesting that at larger group sizes, social conformity to the behaviour of the majority can stifle the ability of fish to innovate-in this case, to induce a collective movement from the unfavourable habitat.
dc.format.extent312926
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofBiology Lettersen
dc.subjectGroupingen
dc.subjectSchoolingen
dc.subjectShoalingen
dc.subjectSocialityen
dc.subjectSwarm intelligenceen
dc.subjectQH301 Biologyen
dc.subjectAgricultural and Biological Sciences (miscellaneous)en
dc.subjectAgricultural and Biological Sciences(all)en
dc.subjectDASen
dc.subject.lccQH301en
dc.titleMid-sized groups perform best in a collective decision task in sticklebacksen
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews. School of Biologyen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews. Centre for Biological Diversityen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews. Centre for Social Learning & Cognitive Evolutionen
dc.identifier.doi10.1098/rsbl.2019.0335
dc.description.statusPeer revieweden


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