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dc.contributor.authorBowker, Michael
dc.contributor.authorGrillo, Federico
dc.contributor.authorArchard, Daniel
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-18T23:36:57Z
dc.date.available2019-10-18T23:36:57Z
dc.date.issued2018-10-19
dc.identifier.citationBowker , M , Grillo , F & Archard , D 2018 , ' CO and O 2 Adsorption on K/Pt (111) ' , Journal of Physical Chemistry C , vol. In press . https://doi.org/10.1021/acs.jpcc.8b08461en
dc.identifier.issn1932-7447
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 256303469
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: 6f0dbf97-a866-42cf-8231-00287ae198b9
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 85055658992
dc.identifier.otherORCID: /0000-0001-9961-1212/work/49891137
dc.identifier.otherWOS: 000463844500069
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10023/18711
dc.descriptionWe are grateful to Toyota for part funding of the PhD studentship to D. A. and to the EU for funding the F.G. studentship.en
dc.description.abstractWe have investigated CO and O2 on K promoted Pt(111) using mainly molecular beams and TPD. Surprisingly, CO adsorption is little affected by the presence of potassium on the surface up to around 1/6th of a monolayer promoter coverage (half of the maximum), even though the chemisorbed state in TPD is more strongly adsorbed. This is because the adsorption is dominated by the precursor state kinetics which are little affected by the K. However, as the K coverage increases and the layer changes from ionic to metallic, then the adsorption of CO diminishes to zero, since both CO and K are electron donors. In contrast the opposite is the case for oxygen adsorption. The sticking probability on the clean surface is very low, but is enormously enhanced at even low coverages of K, and oxygen can adsorb strongly onto the metallic layer to high coverage. A number of oxygen states can be identified in TPD, those desorbing in the same temperature range as for clean Pt, those associated with Pt affected by K at low coverage of the latter, and those on the metallic layer. The former is dissociated oxygen while the latter is molecular peroxide.
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Physical Chemistry Cen
dc.rightsCopyright © 2018 American Chemical Society. This work has been made available online in accordance with the publisher’s policies. This is the author created, accepted version manuscript following peer review and may differ slightly from the final published version. The final published version of this work is available at: https://doi.org/10.1021/acs.jpcc.8b08461en
dc.subjectQD Chemistryen
dc.subjectNDASen
dc.subject.lccQDen
dc.titleCO and O2 Adsorption on K/Pt (111)en
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.description.versionPostprinten
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews.School of Chemistryen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1021/acs.jpcc.8b08461
dc.description.statusPeer revieweden
dc.date.embargoedUntil2019-10-19


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