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dc.contributor.authorUrquhart, Josephine A.
dc.contributor.authorSivakumaran, Magali H.
dc.contributor.authorMacfarlane, Jennifer A
dc.contributor.authorO'Connor, Akira R.
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-19T23:37:31Z
dc.date.available2019-09-19T23:37:31Z
dc.date.issued2018-09-20
dc.identifier255805120
dc.identifierfa3a006e-b4b9-4b74-b438-bff4f20bc2ba
dc.identifier85053560720
dc.identifier000683584500006
dc.identifier.citationUrquhart , J A , Sivakumaran , M H , Macfarlane , J A & O'Connor , A R 2018 , ' fMRI evidence supporting the role of memory conflict in the déjà vu experience ' , Memory , vol. Latest Articles . https://doi.org/10.1080/09658211.2018.1524496en
dc.identifier.issn0965-8211
dc.identifier.otherORCID: /0000-0002-7943-5183/work/48774874
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10023/18521
dc.descriptionThis research was funded by an anonymous donation to the School of Psychology and Neuroscience at the University of St Andrews.en
dc.description.abstractAttempts to generate déjà vu experimentally have largely focused on engineering partial familiarity for stimuli, relying on an ensuing, but unprompted evaluation of conflict to generate the experience. Without verification that experimentally-generated familiarity is accompanied by the awareness of stimulus novelty, these experimental procedures potentially provide an incomplete déjà vu analogue. We used a modified version of the Deese-Roediger-McDermott (DRM) false memory procedure to generate both familiarity and novelty within a déjà vu analogue—we coupled experimentally-generated familiarity with cues indicating that the familiarity was erroneous, using this additional source of mnemonic information to generate cognitive conflict in our participants. We collected fMRI and behavioural data from 21 participants, 16 of whom reported déjà vu. Using univariate contrasts we identified brain regions associated with mnemonic conflict, including the anterior cingulate cortex, medial prefrontal cortex and parietal cortex. This is the first experiment to image an analogue of the déjà vu experience in healthy volunteers. The increased likelihood of déjà vu reports to DRM critical lures correctly identified as “new”, and the activation of neural substrates supporting the experience of cognitive conflict during déjà vu, suggest that the resolution of memory conflict may play an integral role in déjà vu.
dc.format.extent937586
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofMemoryen
dc.subjectFamiliarityen
dc.subjectConflicten
dc.subjectDéjà vuen
dc.subjectfMRIen
dc.subjectMedial prefrontal cortexen
dc.subjectRC0321 Neuroscience. Biological psychiatry. Neuropsychiatryen
dc.subjectDASen
dc.subjectBDPen
dc.subject.lccRC0321en
dc.titlefMRI evidence supporting the role of memory conflict in the déjà vu experienceen
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews. School of Psychology and Neuroscienceen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1080/09658211.2018.1524496
dc.description.statusPeer revieweden
dc.date.embargoedUntil2019-09-20


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