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dc.contributor.authorRoberts, Alan
dc.contributor.authorBorisyuk, Roman
dc.contributor.authorBuhl, Edgar
dc.contributor.authorFerrario, Andrea
dc.contributor.authorKoutsikou, Stella
dc.contributor.authorLi, Wen-Chang
dc.contributor.authorSoffe, Stephen R.
dc.date.accessioned2019-05-13T11:30:07Z
dc.date.available2019-05-13T11:30:07Z
dc.date.issued2019-03
dc.identifier.citationRoberts , A , Borisyuk , R , Buhl , E , Ferrario , A , Koutsikou , S , Li , W-C & Soffe , S R 2019 , ' The decision to move : response times, neuronal circuits and sensory memory in a simple vertebrate ' , Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences , vol. 286 , no. 1899 , 20190297 . https://doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2019.0297en
dc.identifier.issn0962-8452
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 258577651
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: 6a67526f-04b1-4e50-a518-80723f444bf2
dc.identifier.otherPubMed: 30900536
dc.identifier.otherWOS: 000465434800019
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10023/17692
dc.description.abstractAll animals use sensory systems to monitor external events and have to decide whether to move. Response times are long and variable compared to reflexes, and fast escape movements. The complexity of adult vertebrate brains makes it difficult to trace the neuronal circuits underlying basic decisions to move. To simplify the problem, we investigate the nervous system and responses of hatchling frog tadpoles which swim when their skin is stimulated. Studying the neuron-by-neuron pathway from sensory to hindbrain neurons, where the decision to swim is made, has revealed two simple pathways generating excitation which sums to threshold in these neurons to initiate swimming. The direct pathway leads to short, and reliable delays like an escape response. The other includes a population of sensory processing neurons which extend firing to introduce noise and delay into responses. These neurons provide a brief, sensory memory of the stimulus, that allows tadpoles to integrate stimuli occurring within a second or so of each other. We relate these findings to other studies and conclude that sensory memory makes a fundamental contribution to simple decisions and is present in the brainstem of a basic vertebrate at a surprisingly early stage in development.
dc.format.extent7
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofProceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciencesen
dc.rights© 2019, the Author(s). Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved. This work has been made available online in accordance with the publisher's policies. This is the author created accepted version manuscript following peer review and as such may differ slightly from the final published version. The final published version of this work is available at https://doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2019.0297en
dc.subjectDecisionsen
dc.subjectLocomotionen
dc.subjectResponse timesen
dc.subjectSensory memoryen
dc.subjectQH301 Biologyen
dc.subjectQR Microbiologyen
dc.subjectRC0321 Neuroscience. Biological psychiatry. Neuropsychiatryen
dc.subjectAgricultural and Biological Sciences(all)en
dc.subjectBiochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)en
dc.subjectEnvironmental Science(all)en
dc.subjectImmunology and Microbiology(all)en
dc.subject.lccQH301en
dc.subject.lccQRen
dc.subject.lccRC0321en
dc.titleThe decision to move : response times, neuronal circuits and sensory memory in a simple vertebrateen
dc.typeJournal itemen
dc.description.versionPostprinten
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews.School of Psychology and Neuroscienceen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews.Institute of Behavioural and Neural Sciencesen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2019.0297
dc.description.statusPeer revieweden


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