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dc.contributor.authorWhite, Malcolm Frederick
dc.contributor.authorAllers, Thorsten
dc.date.accessioned2019-05-04T23:37:48Z
dc.date.available2019-05-04T23:37:48Z
dc.date.issued2018-07
dc.identifier.citationWhite , M F & Allers , T 2018 , ' DNA repair in the Archaea – an emerging picture ' , FEMS Microbiology Reviews , vol. 42 , no. 4 , pp. 514-526 . https://doi.org/10.1093/femsre/fuy020en
dc.identifier.issn0168-6445
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 252945548
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: 9445403d-1924-4c07-b29f-1ba9290385f5
dc.identifier.otherWOS: 000449194800007
dc.identifier.otherWOS: 000449194800007
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 85057251838
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10023/17645
dc.descriptionMFW is the recipient of a Royal Society Wolfson Research Merit Award. Work in TA’s laboratory is funded by the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC). .en
dc.description.abstractThere has long been a fascination in the DNA Repair pathways of archaea, for two main reasons. Firstly, many archaea inhabit extreme environments where the rate of physical damage to DNA is accelerated. These archaea might reasonably be expected to have particularly robust or novel DNA repair pathways to cope with this. Secondly, the archaea have long been understood to be a lineage distinct from the bacteria, and to share a close relationship with the eukarya, particularly in their information processing systems. Recent discoveries suggest the eukarya arose from within the archaeal domain, and in particular from lineages related to the TACK superphylum and Lokiarchaea. Thus, archaeal DNA repair proteins and pathways can represent a useful model system. This review focuses on recent advances in our understanding of archaeal DNA repair processes including Base Excision Repair (BER), Nucleotide Excision Repair (NER), Mismatch Repair (MMR) and Double Strand Break Repair (DSBR). These advances are discussed in the context of the emerging picture of the evolution and relationship of the three domains of life.
dc.format.extent13
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofFEMS Microbiology Reviewsen
dc.rights© 2018, FEMS. This work has been made available online in accordance with the publisher’s policies. This is the author created, accepted version manuscript following peer review and may differ slightly from the final published version. The final published version of this work is available at https://doi.org/10.1093/femsre/fuy020en
dc.subjectArchaeaen
dc.subjectDNA repairen
dc.subjectHomologous recombinationen
dc.subjectQH301 Biologyen
dc.subjectQR Microbiologyen
dc.subject.lccQH301en
dc.subject.lccQRen
dc.titleDNA repair in the Archaea – an emerging pictureen
dc.typeJournal itemen
dc.description.versionPostprinten
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews.School of Biologyen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews.Biomedical Sciences Research Complexen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1093/femsre/fuy020
dc.description.statusPeer revieweden
dc.date.embargoedUntil2019-05-05


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