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dc.contributor.authorSabiiti, Wilber
dc.contributor.authorMBLA development stakeholders
dc.date.accessioned2019-03-25T10:30:06Z
dc.date.available2019-03-25T10:30:06Z
dc.date.issued2019-03
dc.identifier.citationSabiiti , W & MBLA development stakeholders 2019 , ' United Kingdom–East and Southern Africa partnership at the forefront of developing first ever test that measures patient tuberculosis burden in hours ' , East Africa Science , vol. 1 , no. 1 , pp. 3-8 . https://doi.org/10.24248/EASci-D-18-00008en
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 257743749
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: b2ad83af-0c20-4f94-bc98-6df011fb58fa
dc.identifier.otherORCID: /0000-0002-4742-2791/work/60196333
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10023/17362
dc.descriptionEDCTP for funding the development and trialling of the Molecular bacterial load assay test. GCRF, SCF, PanACEA and University of St Andrews School of Medicine for funding the MBLA stakeholders conference. We acknowledge funding from European and Developing countries Clinical Trials Partnership for funding the development and trialling of the Molecular bacterial load assay test. Funding from Scottish Funding Council – Global Challenges Research Fund, Pan-African Consortium for Evaluation of anti-tuberculosis Antibiotics and University of St Andrews School of Medicine for made the MBLA stakeholders conference possible.en
dc.description.abstractMycobacterium tuberculosis has caused tuberculosis (TB) in humans for at least 3 millennia, but the disease has evaded eradication efforts by all human civilisations despite promising technological advancements. The World Health Organization (WHO) has set a target of ending the TB epidemic by 2035. Going by the current rate of progress, it is estimated that it will take another 160 years to realise the WHO End TB Strategy’s target. Accelerating the eradication of TB will require effective tools for diagnosis, vaccines and medicines to treat the disease, and efficient implementation thereof. This presents a great opportunity for innovators in East Africa and the world over to chip in and develop the best technologies to end TB. With funding from the European and Developing Countries Clinical Trials Partnership (EDCTP), partnerships between the UK-based University of St Andrews and research institutions in East and Southern Africa have led to the development of the first ever test – the molecular bacterial load assay (MBLA) – that measures the number of TB bacteria in a patient and reveals if this number is declining as a patient progresses on treatment. Initial assay results are available within 4 hours. Real-time knowledge of patient mycobacterial burden and the effectiveness of prescribed medications are crucial for timely clinical decisions on patient management.
dc.format.extent6
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofEast Africa Scienceen
dc.rights© Sabiiti. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are properly cited. To view a copy of the license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/. When linking to this article, please use the following permanent link: http://doi.org/10.24248/EASci-D-18-00008.en
dc.subjectTuberculosisen
dc.subjectMolecular bacterial load assayen
dc.subjectTreatment monitoringen
dc.subjectPartnership to accelerate innovationen
dc.subjectRA0421 Public health. Hygiene. Preventive Medicineen
dc.subjectT-NDASen
dc.subject.lccRA0421en
dc.titleUnited Kingdom–East and Southern Africa partnership at the forefront of developing first ever test that measures patient tuberculosis burden in hoursen
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.description.versionPublisher PDFen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews.Infection and Global Health Divisionen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews.School of Medicineen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.24248/EASci-D-18-00008
dc.description.statusPeer revieweden
dc.identifier.urlhttps://www.editorialmanager.com/easci/Default.aspx?pg=login.asp&username=&a=ren
dc.identifier.urlhttps://www.eahealth.org/sites/www.eahealth.org/files/content/attachments/2019-03-22/EASci-v1n1-book-190322-FINAL-4_0.pdfen


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