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dc.contributor.authorBreen, Alexis J.
dc.contributor.authorBonneaud, Clémence C.
dc.contributor.authorHealy, Susan D.
dc.contributor.authorGuillette, Lauren Mary
dc.date.accessioned2019-02-14T17:30:04Z
dc.date.available2019-02-14T17:30:04Z
dc.date.issued2019-05
dc.identifier257443733
dc.identifierb5515d11-7a21-4aed-9401-b1fc60549513
dc.identifier85061694897
dc.identifier000464719200002
dc.identifier.citationBreen , A J , Bonneaud , C C , Healy , S D & Guillette , L M 2019 , ' Social learning about construction behaviour via an artefact ' , Animal Cognition , vol. 22 , no. 3 , pp. 305–315 . https://doi.org/10.1007/s10071-019-01240-xen
dc.identifier.issn1435-9448
dc.identifier.otherORCID: /0000-0002-8059-4480/work/60631327
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10023/17071
dc.descriptionFunding: UK Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BB/M013944/1).en
dc.description.abstractOne source of public information may be the enduring products of others’ behaviour, such as discarded tools or vacated nests. Here, we examined whether observation of a nest affects the material captive zebra finch males prefer when they construct their first nest. It does: for first-time nest construction, males that viewed only an empty cage preferred the colour of material each initially favoured but those males that had observed a pre-built nest of material of their non-preferred colour lost their material-colour preference altogether. Additionally, half of the males that viewed a nest were tested in an environment (the laboratory) different to that in which they were reared (an outdoor aviary). We had expected the aviary-reared (versus laboratory-reared) males would be more uncertain, and thus more likely to select material for their first nest that matched in colour to the colour of the ‘demonstrated’ nest—but this was not the case. The aviary-reared males did, however, tend to touch first the demonstrated colour of material more than did the laboratory-reared males. Together these results show that both observation of a nest and a change in environment can influence the material choices of novice builders. For naïve animal builders, then, construction artefacts can be information resources for learning about potential construction material.
dc.format.extent11
dc.format.extent2000142
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofAnimal Cognitionen
dc.subjectAnimal buildingen
dc.subjectAnimal constructionen
dc.subjectConstruction artefactsen
dc.subjectNest constructionen
dc.subjectMaterial preferenceen
dc.subjectSocial learningen
dc.subjectZebra finchen
dc.subjectQH301 Biologyen
dc.subjectDASen
dc.subject.lccQH301en
dc.titleSocial learning about construction behaviour via an artefacten
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.contributor.sponsorBBSRCen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews. School of Biologyen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews. Centre for Biological Diversityen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews. Centre for Social Learning & Cognitive Evolutionen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews. Institute of Behavioural and Neural Sciencesen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1007/s10071-019-01240-x
dc.description.statusPeer revieweden
dc.identifier.grantnumberBB/M013944/1en


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