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dc.contributor.authorTammaru, Tiit
dc.contributor.authorMarcińczak, Szymon
dc.contributor.authorAunap, Raivo
dc.contributor.authorvan Ham, Maarten
dc.contributor.authorJanssen, Heleen
dc.date.accessioned2019-01-07T12:30:04Z
dc.date.available2019-01-07T12:30:04Z
dc.date.issued2019-01-04
dc.identifier.citationTammaru , T , Marcińczak , S , Aunap , R , van Ham , M & Janssen , H 2019 , ' Relationship between income inequality and residential segregation between socioeconomic groups ' , Regional Studies , vol. Latest Articles . https://doi.org/10.1080/00343404.2018.1540035en
dc.identifier.issn0034-3404
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 256162651
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: d4825c3c-4372-4ae9-b3a4-137c322f7358
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 85059530642
dc.identifier.otherORCID: /0000-0002-2106-0702/work/64697565
dc.identifier.otherWOS: 000521061600002
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10023/16786
dc.descriptionThe research leading to these results received funding from the Estonian Research Council [Institutional Research grant numbers PUT PRG306 and IUT2-17, projects Infotechnological Mobility Laboratory and RITA-Ränne]; and the European Research Council under the European Union’s Seventh Framework Programme (FP/2007- 2013)/ERC [grant agreement number 615159] (ERC Consolidator Grant DEPRIVEDHOODS, Socio-Spatial Inequality, Deprived Neighbourhoods, and Neighbourhood Effects).en
dc.description.abstractThis paper provides new insights into the relationships between income inequality and residential segregation between socioeconomic groups by undertaking a comparative study of European urban regions. In Europe, income inequalities are the lowest in North Europe and the highest in South Europe. In many East European countries, a switch from low inequality to high inequality has taken place. The main findings show that changes in the levels of residential segregation between socioeconomic groups correlate to changes in the levels of income inequality found approximately 10 years earlier, that is, with a time lag.
dc.format.extent12
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofRegional Studiesen
dc.rightsCopyright © 2019 The Author(s). Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, and is not altered, transformed, or built upon in any way.en
dc.subjectIncome equalityen
dc.subjectSocioeconomic segregationen
dc.subjectComparative urban studiesen
dc.subjectSouth Europeen
dc.subjectNorth Europeen
dc.subjectEast Europeen
dc.subjectGF Human ecology. Anthropogeographyen
dc.subjectHT Communities. Classes. Racesen
dc.subject3rd-NDASen
dc.subject.lccGFen
dc.subject.lccHTen
dc.titleRelationship between income inequality and residential segregation between socioeconomic groupsen
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.description.versionPublisher PDFen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews.School of Geography & Sustainable Developmenten
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1080/00343404.2018.1540035
dc.description.statusPeer revieweden
dc.date.embargoedUntil2019-01-04


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