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dc.contributor.authorBishop, Amanda M.
dc.contributor.authorStewart, James E.
dc.contributor.authorPomeroy, Patrick
dc.contributor.authorTwiss, Sean
dc.date.accessioned2018-11-20T00:48:10Z
dc.date.available2018-11-20T00:48:10Z
dc.date.issued2017-12
dc.identifier.citationBishop , A M , Stewart , J E , Pomeroy , P & Twiss , S 2017 , ' Intraseasonal temporal variation of reproductive effort for male grey seals ' , Animal Behaviour , vol. 134 , pp. 167-175 . https://doi.org/10.1016/j.anbehav.2017.10.021en
dc.identifier.issn0003-3472
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 251117133
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: 17f075ee-1c9c-4f6f-af93-c92df238e81a
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 85034615204
dc.identifier.otherORCID: /0000-0003-1603-5630/work/46569075
dc.identifier.otherWOS: 000417983100019
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10023/16506
dc.descriptionThis work was supported by the Durham Doctoral Studentship.en
dc.description.abstractReproductive skew in polygynous mating systems leads to variation in the mating strategies, or the tactics within strategies, adopted by individual males. For example, variation in the timing of reproductive effort might reflect trade-offs between maximizing access to receptive females and minimizing interactions with competitors. For capital breeding grey seals, Halichoerus grypus, male mating success has been positively linked to total duration of tenure, but without differentiation of intraseasonal changes in reproductive effort. The aims of this study were to identify tactics within the Tenured male strategy based on the timing of social dominance as a metric of reproductive effort, and to compare mating success across identified tactics. Our results confirm that duration of stay on the colony explained the most variation in mating success, but effect strength was reduced for tenures longer than 10 days. Additionally, there was evidence that timing of reproductive effort within a breeding season also contributed to observed variation in mating success. Males that maximized their dominance score at or after the peak in female attendance achieved greater mating success, relative to those who were dominant earlier in the breeding season. Males who timed their reproductive effort earlier in the season still achieved some mating success, but it was reduced. Individuals’ tactics were flexible across years, and we found no evidence to support the hypotheses that timing of reproductive effort before or after the peak in female attendance was utilized by smaller Tenured males, or to avoid conflict. These results highlight that understanding temporal scheduling of individual reproductive effort within a breeding season, relative to the availability of resources, constraints of fasting,and intermale competition, is a key aspect to consider when differentiating individual tactics in long-lived, capital polygynous breeders.
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofAnimal Behaviouren
dc.rights© 2017 The Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour. Published by Elsevier Ltd. This work has been made available online in accordance with the publisher’s policies. This is the author created, accepted version manuscript following peer review and may differ slightly from the final published version. The final published version of this work is available at https://doi.org/10.1016/j.anbehav.2017.10.021en
dc.subjectMating tacticsen
dc.subjectGrey sealsen
dc.subjectReproductive efforten
dc.subjectDominanceen
dc.subjectGC Oceanographyen
dc.subjectQH301 Biologyen
dc.subjectNDASen
dc.subjectNERCen
dc.subject.lccGCen
dc.subject.lccQH301en
dc.titleIntraseasonal temporal variation of reproductive effort for male grey sealsen
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.description.versionPostprinten
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews.School of Biologyen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews.Sea Mammal Research Uniten
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews.Marine Alliance for Science & Technology Scotlanden
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews.Scottish Oceans Instituteen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews.Centre for Research into Ecological & Environmental Modellingen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.anbehav.2017.10.021
dc.description.statusPeer revieweden
dc.date.embargoedUntil2018-11-20


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