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dc.contributor.authorPetrie, Malcolm Robert
dc.date.accessioned2018-11-12T16:30:15Z
dc.date.available2018-11-12T16:30:15Z
dc.date.issued2018-12
dc.identifier.citationPetrie , M R 2018 , ' Anti-socialism, liberalism and individualism : rethinking the realignment of Scottish politics, 1945–1970 ' , Transactions of the Royal Historical Society , vol. 28 , pp. 197-217 . https://doi.org/10.1017/S0080440118000105en
dc.identifier.issn0080-4401
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 255093055
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: b5d42da4-9d8c-4b33-94ff-90e1a49ec158
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 85064499567
dc.identifier.otherORCID: /0000-0001-6399-2463/work/60427437
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10023/16439
dc.descriptionThe author would like to acknowledge the generous support offered by the award of an early career fellowship by the Leverhulme Trust (ECF–2015–391), which facilitated the research that informs this article.en
dc.description.abstractThis paper presents an alternative interpretation of Scottish politics between 1945 and 1970, a period that witnessed the decline of a once-powerful Unionist tradition, the revival of Liberalism and the rise of the Scottish National party (SNP). While existing accounts have focused principally upon social and economic factors, this study foregrounds the role of ideology and rhetoric. During the 1940s and early 1950s, Scottish Unionists were, like their Conservative colleagues elsewhere in Britain, able to construct a popular, but essentially negative, anti-socialist coalition that prioritised the defence of individual liberty. This electoral alliance, defined by opposition to Labour's programme of nationalisation and expressed via an individualist idiom, was able to attract broad support; it was, however, always provisional, and proved increasingly difficult to sustain after the Conservative party returned to office in 1951. It was, this paper suggests, the fragmenting of this anti-socialist coalition in the late 1950s and early 1960s that created the opportunity for both the Liberals and the SNP to present alternative renderings of this individualist appeal, and to emerge as credible political alternatives. Crucially, by the 1960s, individual liberty was beginning to be understood in constitutional rather than economic terms.
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofTransactions of the Royal Historical Societyen
dc.rights© Royal Historical Society 2018. This work has been made available online in accordance with the publisher’s policies. This is the author created accepted version manuscript following peer review and as such may differ slightly from the final published version. The final published version of this work is available at https://doi.org/10.1017/S0080440118000105.en
dc.subjectDA Great Britainen
dc.subjectD839 Post-war History, 1945 onen
dc.subjectJA Political science (General)en
dc.subjectT-NDASen
dc.subjectBDCen
dc.subjectR2Cen
dc.subject.lccDAen
dc.subject.lccD839en
dc.subject.lccJAen
dc.titleAnti-socialism, liberalism and individualism : rethinking the realignment of Scottish politics, 1945–1970en
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.description.versionPostprinten
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews.School of Historyen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews.Institute of Legal and Constitutional Researchen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1017/S0080440118000105
dc.description.statusPeer revieweden
dc.date.embargoedUntil2018-11-02


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