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dc.contributor.authorKlump, Barbara C.
dc.contributor.authorMasuda, Bryce M.
dc.contributor.authorSt Clair, James J. H.
dc.contributor.authorRutz, Christian
dc.date.accessioned2018-10-24T10:30:06Z
dc.date.available2018-10-24T10:30:06Z
dc.date.issued2018-10-21
dc.identifier.citationKlump , B C , Masuda , B M , St Clair , J J H & Rutz , C 2018 , ' Preliminary observations of tool-processing behaviour in Hawaiian crows Corvus hawaiiensis ' Communicative and Integrative Biology , vol. Latest Articles . https://doi.org/10.1080/19420889.2018.1509637en
dc.identifier.issn1942-0889
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 255271439
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: 8e02fe11-554a-4116-b8fa-cbd302bb5419
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 85055466440
dc.identifier.otherORCID: /0000-0001-5187-7417/work/60427554
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10023/16309
dc.descriptionThis project was funded through a BBSRC David Phillips Fellowship (BB/G023913/2 to C.R.), and a PhD studentship by the BBSRC and the University of St Andrews (to B.K.). Funding for the ‘Alalā conservation breeding programme was provided by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, State of Hawai‘i Division of Forestry and Wildlife, Moore Family Foundation, several anonymous donors, and San Diego Zoo Global.en
dc.description.abstractVery few animal species habitually make and use foraging tools. We recently discovered that the Hawaiian crow is a highly skilled, natural tool user. Most captive adults in our experiment spontaneously used sticks to access out-of-reach food from a range of extraction tasks, exhibiting a surprising degree of dexterity. Moreover, many birds modified tools before or during deployment, and some even manufactured tools from raw materials. In this invited addendum article, we describe and discuss these observations in more detail. Our preliminary data, and comparisons with the better-studied New Caledonian crow, suggest that the Hawaiian crow has extensive tool-modification and manufacture abilities. To chart the full extent of the species’ natural tool-making repertoire, we have started conducting dedicated experiments where subjects are given access to suitable raw materials for tool manufacture, but not ready-to-use tools.
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofCommunicative and Integrative Biologyen
dc.rightsCopyright © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.en
dc.subjectAlalaen
dc.subjectConstruction behaviouren
dc.subjectCorviden
dc.subjectExtractive foragingen
dc.subjectHawaiian crowen
dc.subjectMaterial selectivityen
dc.subjectNew Caledonian crowen
dc.subjectTool manufactureen
dc.subjectQH301 Biologyen
dc.subjectQL Zoologyen
dc.subjectT-NDASen
dc.subject.lccQH301en
dc.subject.lccQLen
dc.titlePreliminary observations of tool-processing behaviour in Hawaiian crows Corvus hawaiiensisen
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.description.versionPublisher PDFen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews.Centre for Social Learning & Cognitive Evolutionen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews.School of Biologyen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews.Centre for Biological Diversityen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1080/19420889.2018.1509637
dc.description.statusPeer revieweden


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