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dc.contributor.authorWilson, Lindsay J.
dc.contributor.authorGrellier, Kate
dc.contributor.authorHammond, Philip S.
dc.date.accessioned2018-08-20T23:40:36Z
dc.date.available2018-08-20T23:40:36Z
dc.date.issued2017-10
dc.identifier.citationWilson , L J , Grellier , K & Hammond , P S 2017 , ' Improved estimates of digestion correction factors and passage rates for harbor seal ( Phoca vitulina ) prey in the northeast Atlantic ' , Marine Mammal Science , vol. 33 , no. 4 , pp. 1149-1169 . https://doi.org/10.1111/mms.12436en
dc.identifier.issn1748-7692
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 250475053
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: 1a482069-de9a-49ed-8179-3f81e22d5129
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 85031801529
dc.identifier.otherORCID: /0000-0002-2381-8302/work/47531651
dc.identifier.otherWOS: 000413358500009
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10023/15848
dc.description.abstractDiet composition in pinnipeds is widely estimated using hard prey remains recovered from feces. To estimate the size and number of prey represented in fecal samples accurately, digestion correction factors (DCFs) must be applied to measurements and counts of fish otoliths and cephalopod beaks. In this study, 101 whole prey feeding trials were conducted with six harbor seals (Phoca vitulina) and 18 prey species. We derived species- and grade-specific estimates of digestion coefficients (DCs) and species-specific recovery rates (RRs) to account for partial and complete digestion, respectively. Greater than 98% of otoliths were passed within three days of consumption. RRs were smallest for Atlantic salmon smolts (RR = 0.306, SE = 0.031) and increasingly larger for sandeels (RR = 0.494, SE = 0.017), flatfish (RR = 0.789, SE = 0.033), and large gadoids (RR = 0.944, SE = 0.034). Species-specific otolith width DCs were smallest for Trisopterus species (DC = 1.14, SE = 0.015) and increasingly larger for flatfish (DC = 1.27, SE = 0.045), large gadoids (DC = 1.32, SE = 0.067) and sandeels (DC = 1.57, SE = 0.035). RRs were similar to those from gray seals (Halichoerus grypus), but harbor seal species- and grade-specific DCs were generally smaller. Differences in partial and complete digestion rates among prey species and between seal species highlight the importance of applying DCFs when reconstructing diet.
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofMarine Mammal Scienceen
dc.rights© 2017 Society for Marine Mammalogy. This work has been made available online in accordance with the publisher’s policies. This is the author created, accepted version manuscript following peer review and may differ slightly from the final published version. The final published version of this work is available at https://doi.org/10.1111/mms.12436en
dc.subjectDigestionen
dc.subjectDigestion correction factoren
dc.subjectDigestion coefficienten
dc.subjectRecovery rateen
dc.subjectPassage rateen
dc.subjectHarbor sealen
dc.subjectDieten
dc.subjectPreyen
dc.subjectOtolithen
dc.subjectBeaken
dc.subjectQH301 Biologyen
dc.subjectNDASen
dc.subject.lccQH301en
dc.titleImproved estimates of digestion correction factors and passage rates for harbor seal (Phoca vitulina) prey in the northeast Atlanticen
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.description.versionPostprinten
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews.School of Biologyen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews.Sea Mammal Research Uniten
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews.Centre for Research into Ecological & Environmental Modellingen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews.Scottish Oceans Instituteen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews.Marine Alliance for Science & Technology Scotlanden
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1111/mms.12436
dc.description.statusPeer revieweden
dc.date.embargoedUntil2018-08-21
dc.identifier.urlhttp://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/mms.12436/full#footer-support-infoen


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