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dc.contributor.authorJalovaara, Marika
dc.contributor.authorKulu, Hill
dc.date.accessioned2018-07-10T14:30:08Z
dc.date.available2018-07-10T14:30:08Z
dc.date.issued2018-10-01
dc.identifier.citationJalovaara , M & Kulu , H 2018 , ' Separation risk over union duration : an immediate itch? ' , European Sociological Review , vol. 34 , no. 5 , pp. 486–500 . https://doi.org/10.1093/esr/jcy017en
dc.identifier.issn0266-7215
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 253407580
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: e1826ccc-4d32-4434-8818-d75789fcfd7e
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 85051745039
dc.identifier.otherWOS: 000446192900002
dc.identifier.otherORCID: /0000-0001-8808-0719/work/75997000
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10023/15195
dc.descriptionThis work was supported by the Academy of Finland (decision number 275030).en
dc.description.abstractThis study examines the risk of separation over union duration. Previous research reports a rising-falling pattern of divorce risk over marriage duration consistent with psychological notions of ‘honeymoon’ and ‘seven-year itch’. Little is known about the variation of the separation risk over cohabitation duration or over marriage duration when the length of partnership is measured from the beginning of coresidence. We include data on non-marital and marital unions and propose a novel way of treating cohabitation and marriage as episodes of the same union. We use Finnish large-scale register data and control for individuals’ observed and unobserved characteristics. Our results show that in cohabitations, the separation rate is highest at the beginning of union. Entry into marriage is followed by a significant drop in separation levels and a modest rising-falling pattern, which is independent of the length of premarital cohabitation. Clearly, the rising-falling pattern is robust but only part of a larger picture and reflects processes specific to marriage. Despite high prevalence of cohabitation, marrying entails more permanence, with some short ‘honeymoon’ effect and some long-term ‘effect’, much of which probably reflects self-selection of committed and satisfied cohabiters to marriage.
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofEuropean Sociological Reviewen
dc.rights© The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted reuse, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.en
dc.subjectDivorceen
dc.subjectSeparationen
dc.subjectMarriageen
dc.subjectCohabitationen
dc.subjectSurvival Analysisen
dc.subjectHQ The family. Marriage. Womanen
dc.subject3rd-DASen
dc.subjectBDCen
dc.subject.lccHQen
dc.titleSeparation risk over union duration : an immediate itch?en
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.description.versionPublisher PDFen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews.School of Geography & Sustainable Developmenten
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1093/esr/jcy017
dc.description.statusPeer revieweden


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