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dc.contributor.authorBrett, Roddy
dc.date.accessioned2017-12-29T00:31:42Z
dc.date.available2017-12-29T00:31:42Z
dc.date.issued2016-06-28
dc.identifier.citationBrett , R 2016 , ' Peace without social reconciliation? Understanding the trial of Generals Ríos Montt and Rodriguez Sánchez in the wake of Guatemala’s genocide ' , Journal of Genocide Research , vol. 18 , no. 2-3 , pp. 285-303 . https://doi.org/10.1080/14623528.2016.1186955en
dc.identifier.issn1462-3528
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 245501959
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: 8c28aec0-01c4-4b16-804b-061ebcc166d3
dc.identifier.otherWOS: 000384462900009
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 85052474681
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10023/12392
dc.descriptionI wish to thank Bridget Conley-Zilkic and Alex de Waal at the World Peace Foundation for their financial support.en
dc.description.abstractThis article argues that the legal trial against Generals Efraín Ríos Montt and José Mauricio Rodriguez Sánchez for genocide and crimes against humanity has evidenced the interplay between the complex factors shaping post-conflict reconstruction and social reconciliation in post-genocide Guatemala, and, ultimately, the disjunctive impact of the country’s peace process. The ‘genocide trial’ then is more than a legal process in that it represents a thermometer for Guatemala’s peace process and, ultimately, for testing the nature and stability of the post-genocide/post-conflict conjuncture. Interiorization of human rights frameworks and justice mechanisms by indigenous and human rights activists, including of the Genocide Convention, has consolidated a partial rights culture. However, the trial and the overturning of its verdict have simultaneously evidenced the instability, fragility and disjunctive nature of post-conflict peace and the continuing impact of the profound legacy of the genocide and of social authoritarianism. The article argues that while the trial has wielded broad impact within both state institutions and society, consolidating indigenous political actors, it has simultaneously fortified spoilers and evidenced indigenous collective memory as a fragmented and contested sphere.
dc.format.extent19
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Genocide Researchen
dc.rights© 2016 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. This work has been made available online in accordance with the publisher’s policies. This is the author created, accepted version manuscript following peer review and may differ slightly from the final published version. The final published version of this work is available at: https://doi.org/10.1080/14623528.2016.1186955en
dc.subjectGenocideen
dc.subjectPolitical violenceen
dc.subjectGuatemalaen
dc.subjectIndigenous peopleen
dc.subjectTransitional Justiceen
dc.subjectJZ International relationsen
dc.subjectBDCen
dc.subject.lccJZen
dc.titlePeace without social reconciliation? Understanding the trial of Generals Ríos Montt and Rodriguez Sánchez in the wake of Guatemala’s genocideen
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.description.versionPostprinten
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews.School of International Relationsen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews.The Handa Centre for the Study of Terrorism and Political Violenceen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1080/14623528.2016.1186955
dc.description.statusPeer revieweden
dc.date.embargoedUntil2017-12-28


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