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dc.contributor.authorMikolai, Julia
dc.contributor.authorKulu, Hill
dc.date.accessioned2017-11-29T13:30:06Z
dc.date.available2017-11-29T13:30:06Z
dc.date.issued2017-11-28
dc.identifier.citationMikolai , J & Kulu , H 2017 , ' Short- and long-term effects of divorce and separation on housing tenure in England and Wales ' , Population Studies-A Journal of Demography , vol. 72 , no. 1 , pp. 17-39 . https://doi.org/10.1080/00324728.2017.1391955en
dc.identifier.issn0032-4728
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 250163911
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: f6a92de7-455b-4ff3-adce-0885a3510b52
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 85035086195
dc.identifier.otherORCID: /0000-0002-7733-6659/work/48516896
dc.identifier.otherORCID: /0000-0001-8808-0719/work/75996991
dc.identifier.otherWOS: 000425792600002
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10023/12189
dc.descriptionPartnerLife is supported by a grant from the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO, grant no. 464-13-148), the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG, grant no. WA 1502/6-1) and the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC, grant no. ES/L01663X/1) in the Open Research Area Plus scheme.en
dc.description.abstractThis paper investigates the effect of divorce and separation on individuals’ housing tenure in England and Wales. We apply competing-risks event history models to data from the British Household Panel Survey and the UKHLS Understanding Society to analyse the risk of a move of single, married, cohabiting, and separated men and women to different tenure types. Separated individuals are more likely to experience a tenure change than those who are single or are in a relationship. They are most likely to move to private renting; however, women are also likely to move to social renting whereas men are likely to move to homeownership. This pattern persists when we account for time since separation and order of moves indicating a potential long-term effect of separation on housing tenure. This long-term effect is especially crucial for separated women who cannot afford homeownership.
dc.format.extent23
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofPopulation Studies-A Journal of Demographyen
dc.rights© 2017 The Author(s). Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.en
dc.subjectSeparationen
dc.subjectShort- and long-term effecten
dc.subjectHousing tenureen
dc.subjectEngland and Walesen
dc.subjectMultilevel event history analysisen
dc.subjectH Social Sciences (General)en
dc.subjectHM Sociologyen
dc.subjectHQ The family. Marriage. Womanen
dc.subject3rd-DASen
dc.subject.lccH1en
dc.subject.lccHMen
dc.subject.lccHQen
dc.titleShort- and long-term effects of divorce and separation on housing tenure in England and Walesen
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.description.versionPublisher PDFen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews.School of Geography & Sustainable Developmenten
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1080/00324728.2017.1391955
dc.description.statusPeer revieweden
dc.date.embargoedUntil2017-11-28


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