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dc.contributor.authorHarris, Mark
dc.date.accessioned2017-11-23T13:30:09Z
dc.date.available2017-11-23T13:30:09Z
dc.date.issued2017-12
dc.identifier.citationHarris , M 2017 , ' Revisiting first contacts on the Amazon 1500-1562 ' Tempo , vol. 23 , no. 3 , pp. 508-527 . https://doi.org/10.1590/tem-1980-542x2017v230306en
dc.identifier.issn1413-7704
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 251605195
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: 456ce4ad-851f-4728-9773-8e080ea34df7
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 85033792824
dc.identifier.otherORCID: /0000-0003-1124-5217/work/47725807
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10023/12158
dc.description.abstractThis article revisits four well-known accounts of the first European encounters with Amerindians in the Amazon. The sporadic character of these encounters make the impact on Amerindian societies irregular and uneven. My analysis is directed to the present condition as encountered, especially the variety of contacts. This approach obliges the text be treated as a whole, rather than being read selectively. Maintaining the integrity of the text allows us to see the different kinds of relations in their contexts. My intention is to use these reports to search for the bridges across cultural separations. Each drew the other towards them, in their own ways. These steps opened the way for the “refounding” of indigenous riverine societies in the seventeenth century.en
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofTempoen
dc.rights© 2017, Publisher / the Author(s). This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License.en
dc.subjectAmazonen
dc.subjectEncounteren
dc.subjectIndiansen
dc.subjectGN Anthropologyen
dc.subjectT-NDASen
dc.subject.lccGNen
dc.titleRevisiting first contacts on the Amazon 1500-1562en
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.description.versionPublisher PDFen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews. Social Anthropologyen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews. School of Philosophical, Anthropological and Film Studiesen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1590/tem-1980-542x2017v230306
dc.description.statusPeer revieweden


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