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dc.contributor.authorPaipais, Vassilios
dc.date.accessioned2017-09-20T23:32:00Z
dc.date.available2017-09-20T23:32:00Z
dc.date.issued2016-09-20
dc.identifier.citationPaipais , V 2016 , ' First image revisited: human nature, original sin and international relations ' Journal of International Relations and Development . DOI: 10.1057/s41268-016-0072-yen
dc.identifier.issn1408-6980
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 241247144
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: c3443a15-76ae-4ce7-8d79-b412c6079380
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 85029602268
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10023/11704
dc.description.abstractIn Waltz’s famous classification, human nature’s propensity to evil is catalogued as a first-image causal explanation of war. Ever since, human nature explanations of conflict have been attacked for resting on metaphysical assumptions and a priori pessimism. This paper argues that modern conceptions about the inherent wickedness of human nature or, equally, reductionist sociobiological explanations about its hard-wired conflict-proneness are impoverished secularised versions of Christian anthropological assumptions grounded in the doctrine of original sin. Itself a widely contested dogma, in its Augustinian formulation it was closely connected with a soteriological perspective, that is, a defence of its status as a corollary of the doctrine that all human beings are equally in need of salvation in Jesus Christ. However, its use was never entirely disconnected from the purposes of theodicy and Christian apologetics striving to reconcile the existence of a benevolent and omnipotent God with the reality of evil and suffering in the world. It is this latter legacy – associated with the explanation of suffering and evil in the world but stripped of its salvific eschatological content – that is picked up by secularist theorisations of human nature which tend to reduce the paradox of original sin to the parody of man’s evil nature.en
dc.format.extent31en
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of International Relations and Developmenten
dc.rights© Macmillan Publishers Ltd 2016. This work is made available online in accordance with the publisher’s policies. This is the author created, accepted version manuscript following peer review and may differ slightly from the final published version. The final published version of this work is available at: https://dx.doi.org/ 10.1057/s41268-016-0072-yen
dc.subjectHuman natureen
dc.subjectOriginal Sinen
dc.subjectAugustineen
dc.subjectKanten
dc.subjectNiebuhren
dc.subjectB Philosophy (General)en
dc.subjectBT Doctrinal Theologyen
dc.subjectJZ International relationsen
dc.subject.lccB1en
dc.subject.lccBTen
dc.subject.lccJZen
dc.titleFirst image revisited: human nature, original sin and international relationsen
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.description.versionPostprinten
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews. School of International Relationsen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1057/s41268-016-0072-y
dc.description.statusPeer revieweden
dc.date.embargoedUntil20-09-20


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