Show simple item record

Files in this item

Thumbnail

Item metadata

dc.contributor.authorFiori, Francesca
dc.contributor.authorGraham, Elspeth
dc.contributor.authorFeng, Zhiqiang
dc.date.accessioned2017-09-13T12:30:09Z
dc.date.available2017-09-13T12:30:09Z
dc.date.issued2019-01
dc.identifier.citationFiori , F , Graham , E & Feng , Z 2019 , ' Household changes and diversity in housing consumption at older ages in Scotland ' Ageing & Society , vol. 39 , no. 1 , pp. 161-193 . https://doi.org/10.1017/S0144686X17000873en
dc.identifier.issn0144-686X
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 250565993
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: d2c13252-4f96-4e28-9f88-f12b7d9ba6ea
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 85057584856
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10023/11651
dc.descriptionThis research was funded by ESRC Secondary Data Analysis Initiative, Grant number ES/K003747/1.en
dc.description.abstractThis paper contributes to understanding housing adjustments in later life by investigating the role of four key lifecourse transitions experienced by older individuals and their households, namely changes in health, retirement, union transitions and adult children leaving the household. Using data from a representative sample of the Scottish population for the decade 2001–2011, the study examines who moves and, for movers, whether they adjust their housing size in response to changes in their personal and household circumstances. In particular, the study explores diversity in housing consumption at older ages by investigating whether the triggers of upsizing or downsizing differ across tenure groups. The majority of older adults in Scotland do not change their place of residence during the study decade. For the minority who do move, all four lifecourse transitions are significant triggers for residential relocation but there is considerable diversity across the two major tenure groups in the influence of household changes on their housing consumption adjustments. In both tenure groups, however, the presence of children in the household is associated with upsizing and is a significant impediment to downsizing. Given the relative rootedness of older parents with co-resident adult children and their propensity to upsize rather than downsize if they move, our findings raise concerns over the interdependencies between younger and older generations in the housing market.en
dc.format.extent33en
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofAgeing & Societyen
dc.rights© Cambridge University Press 2017. This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.en
dc.subjectHousehold changesen
dc.subjectResidential movesen
dc.subjectHousing adjustmentsen
dc.subjectDownsizingen
dc.subjectUpsizingen
dc.subjectOlder adultsen
dc.subjectScotlanden
dc.subjectGF Human ecology. Anthropogeographyen
dc.subjectH Social Sciencesen
dc.subject3rd-DASen
dc.subject.lccGFen
dc.subject.lccHen
dc.titleHousehold changes and diversity in housing consumption at older ages in Scotlanden
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.description.versionPublisher PDFen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews. School of Geography & Sustainable Developmenten
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1017/S0144686X17000873
dc.description.statusPeer revieweden


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record