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dc.contributor.authorHolzleitner, Iris J.
dc.contributor.authorPerrett, David I.
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-14T11:30:08Z
dc.date.available2017-08-14T11:30:08Z
dc.date.issued2017-12
dc.identifier.citationHolzleitner , I J & Perrett , D I 2017 , ' Women’s preferences for men’s facial masculinity : trade-off accounts revisited ' Adaptive Human Behavior and Physiology , vol. 3 , no. 4 , pp. 304-320 . https://doi.org/10.1007/s40750-017-0070-3en
dc.identifier.issn2198-7335
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 250289821
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: 5b61917a-7f0a-444d-af35-d7f6b01f3c61
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 85034418275
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10023/11441
dc.identifier.urihttps://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs40750-017-0070-3#SupplementaryMaterialen
dc.description.abstractStudies on mate preferences have demonstrated that women’s perception of male attractiveness is sensitive to men’s facial masculinity, and that women’s preferences for facial masculinity are subject to individual differences, such as own condition. These individual differences have been linked to potential trade-offs that women face given the hypothesized benefits and costs that masculinity may cue in a potential partner. Whereas most studies based conclusions regarding such trade-offs on shifts in mean preferences for a feminized vs. masculinized face shape, here we directly investigated attractiveness as a function of different levels of masculinity. Using computer-graphic methods, we manipulated the facial masculinity of men’s 3D faces to vary between extremely feminine and hypermasculine, and assessed women’s preferences for these different masculinity levels in the light of individual differences in self-rated attractiveness, financial worries, pathogen disgust sensitivity, self-reported health and relationship status. Our findings show that some individual differences shift preferences towards a generally lower or higher masculinity level, whereas others affect the tolerance to low vs. high levels of masculinity. We suggest that the use of preference curves allows for a more comprehensive investigation of how and why women’s preferences for masculinity may shift under different contexts.en
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofAdaptive Human Behavior and Physiologyen
dc.rights© The Authors 2017. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made.en
dc.subjectMasculinityen
dc.subjectAttractivenessen
dc.subject3Den
dc.subjectFace shapeen
dc.subjectIndividual differencesen
dc.subjectBF Psychologyen
dc.subjectDASen
dc.subject.lccBFen
dc.titleWomen’s preferences for men’s facial masculinity : trade-off accounts revisiteden
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.description.versionPublisher PDFen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews. School of Psychology and Neuroscienceen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews. Institute of Behavioural and Neural Sciencesen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews. Centre for Social Learning & Cognitive Evolutionen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1007/s40750-017-0070-3
dc.description.statusPeer revieweden


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