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dc.contributor.authorKuehne, Alexander J. C.
dc.contributor.authorGather, Malte C.
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-08T23:34:05Z
dc.date.available2017-08-08T23:34:05Z
dc.date.issued2016-11-09
dc.identifier.citationKuehne , A J C & Gather , M C 2016 , ' Organic lasers: recent developments on materials, device geometries, and fabrication techniques ' Chemical Reviews , vol. 116 , no. 21 , pp. 12823-12864 . https://doi.org/10.1021/acs.chemrev.6b00172en
dc.identifier.issn0009-2665
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 245057151
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: c694c758-650d-457c-879f-bb2f1069cb75
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 84994531631
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10023/11411
dc.descriptionMCG acknowledges financial support through the ERC Starting Grant ABLASE (640012) and the European Union Marie Curie Career Integration Grant (PCIG12-GA-2012-334407). AJCK acknowledges financial support by the German Federal Ministry for Education and Research through a NanoMatFutur research group (BMBF grant no. 13N13522).en
dc.description.abstractOrganic dyes have been used as gain medium for lasers since the 1960s, long before the advent of today’s organic electronic devices. Organic gain materials are highly attractive for lasing due to their chemical tunability and large stimulated emission cross section. While the traditional dye laser has been largely replaced by solid-state lasers, a number of new and miniaturized organic lasers have emerged that hold great potential for lab-on-chip applications, biointegration, low-cost sensing and related areas, which benefit from the unique properties of organic gain materials. On the fundamental level, these include high exciton binding energy, low refractive index (compared to inorganic semiconductors), and ease of spectral and chemical tuning. On a technological level, mechanical flexibility and compatibility with simple processing techniques such as printing, roll-to-roll, self-assembly, and soft-lithography are most relevant. Here, the authors provide a comprehensive review of the developments in the field over the past decade, discussing recent advances in organic gain materials, which are today often based on solid-state organic semiconductors, as well as optical feedback structures, and device fabrication. Recent efforts toward continuous wave operation and electrical pumping of solid-state organic lasers are reviewed, and new device concepts and emerging applications are summarized.en
dc.format.extent42en
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofChemical Reviewsen
dc.rights© 2016, American Chemical Society. This work is made available online in accordance with the publisher’s policies. This is the author created, accepted version manuscript following peer review and may differ slightly from the final published version. The final published version of this work is available at pubs.acs.org / https://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acs.chemrev.6b00172en
dc.subjectQD Chemistryen
dc.subjectT Technologyen
dc.subject.lccQDen
dc.subject.lccTen
dc.titleOrganic lasers: recent developments on materials, device geometries, and fabrication techniquesen
dc.typeJournal itemen
dc.description.versionPostprinten
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews. School of Physics and Astronomyen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews. Organic Semiconductor Centreen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews. Biomedical Sciences Research Complexen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1021/acs.chemrev.6b00172
dc.description.statusPeer revieweden
dc.date.embargoedUntil08-08-20


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