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dc.contributor.authorGani, J. K.
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-10T11:30:12Z
dc.date.available2017-07-10T11:30:12Z
dc.date.issued2017-06
dc.identifier.citationGani , J K 2017 , ' The erasure of race : cosmopolitanism and the illusion of Kantian hospitality ' Millennium: Journal of International Studies , vol. 45 , no. 3 , pp. 425-446 . https://doi.org/10.1177/0305829817714064en
dc.identifier.issn0305-8298
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 250418862
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: 14c5e4ff-9a08-4c1b-9702-a657929499e9
dc.identifier.otherRIS: urn:05567B3BDC7814B78AB1A7AC62723585
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 85024490468
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10023/11176
dc.description.abstractThis article explores three key arguments: Firstly, it seeks to demonstrate the contradictions and limits within Kantian hospitality, and its links to colonialism and practices of racialisation. The acclaimed universalism of Kant's law of hospitality forecloses a discussion of its dualism, and erases the historical, racist context in which it was conceived. The prioritization of concept over conception allows Kant's theory on race to be obscured from official discourse and framing of policies while it still courses through inherited perceptions and theories. Secondly, in making my case, I will be applying the notion of coloniality, coined by Aníbal Quijano and later developed by Walter Mignolo, to the existing but small body of critical discourse on Kant and race. Debates initiated on the peripheries of philosophy, law and anthropology in the 1990s have led the way in this regard. However, given the time that has elapsed, it is notable that their work has received little scrutiny in political theory and International Relations theory, and thus warrants renewed attention. I argue that the notion of coloniality provides a useful lens through which to do so, and a vehicle through which to apply those excavations to a contemporary context. Finally, the article explores the extent to which Kantian thought constitutes 'modern' cosmopolitanism, and draws attention to the inadvertently complicit role of second-generation cosmopolitans in the erasure of race from the study of Kant. The relationship between the collective erasure of race and racism in academia and European practice towards refugees and immigrants is briefly considered.
dc.format.extent22
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofMillennium: Journal of International Studiesen
dc.rights© 2017 the Author. This work has been made available online in accordance with the publisher’s policies. This is the author created accepted version manuscript following peer review and as such may differ slightly from the final published version. The final published version of this work is available at: https://doi.org/10.1177/0305829817714064en
dc.subjectKanten
dc.subjectRaceen
dc.subjectHospitalityen
dc.subjectH Social Sciences (General)en
dc.subjectHT Communities. Classes. Racesen
dc.subjectJA Political science (General)en
dc.subjectB Philosophy (General)en
dc.subjectT-NDASen
dc.subject.lccH1en
dc.subject.lccHTen
dc.subject.lccJAen
dc.subject.lccB1en
dc.titleThe erasure of race : cosmopolitanism and the illusion of Kantian hospitalityen
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.description.versionPostprinten
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews.School of International Relationsen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1177/0305829817714064
dc.description.statusPeer revieweden


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