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dc.contributor.authorLang, Anthony
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-29T23:33:05Z
dc.date.available2017-06-29T23:33:05Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.citationLang , A 2016 , ' Thomas Hobbes and a chastened “global” constitution : the contested boundaries of the law ' Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy , vol. 19 , no. 1 , pp. 103-119 . DOI: 10.1080/13698230.2015.1122357en
dc.identifier.issn1369-8230
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 231567737
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: 63266428-3ac5-4339-afb4-e797796bee94
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 84955346186
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10023/11118
dc.description.abstractHobbes’ account of politics, law and obligation has long been read, especially by realists in international affairs, as leaving no space for international law or institutions. This paper argues that a more nuanced reading of Hobbes’ ideas about law and politics provides support for not only a defence of international law but a defence of a (chastened) global constitution. Hobbes’ constitutionalism does not derive from a separation or balance of powers but on two other elements of constitutionalism: the importance of the individual and the centrality of law. The paper proceeds as follows: The first section locates Hobbes theory of law in relation to his theory of authority, drawing on David Dyzenhaus’s emphasis on the rule of law in Hobbes. The second section draws on theorists such as Larry May to find a defence of international law and institutions, what I call international constitutionalism. The third section turns to Richard Flathman’s interpretation of Hobbes as a theorist of liberal self-making, suggesting how his insights can be applied globally. The conclusion brings these thoughts to bear on the relevance of Hobbes for global law and politicsen
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofCritical Review of International Social and Political Philosophyen
dc.rights© 2016 Taylor & Francis. This work is made available online in accordance with the publisher’s policies. This is the author created, accepted version manuscript following peer review and may differ slightly from the final published version. The final published version of this work is available at: https://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13698230.2015.1122357en
dc.subjectThomas Hobbesen
dc.subjectLiberalismen
dc.subjectDavid Dyzenhausen
dc.subjectLarry Mayen
dc.subjectRichard Flathmanen
dc.subjectGlobal constitutionalismen
dc.subjectJZ International relationsen
dc.subjectK Law (General)en
dc.subjectB Philosophy (General)en
dc.subject.lccJZen
dc.subject.lccK1en
dc.subject.lccB1en
dc.titleThomas Hobbes and a chastened “global” constitution : the contested boundaries of the lawen
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.description.versionPostprinten
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews. School of International Relationsen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews. Institute of Legal and Constitutional Researchen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews. Centre for Global Constitutionalismen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1080/13698230.2015.1122357
dc.description.statusPeer revieweden
dc.date.embargoedUntil29-06-20


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