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dc.contributor.authorDonaldson, Lucy Fife
dc.date.accessioned2017-03-06T17:30:08Z
dc.date.available2017-03-06T17:30:08Z
dc.date.issued2017-03
dc.identifier.citationDonaldson , L F 2017 , ' Feeling and filmmaking : the design and affect of film sound ' , The New Soundtrack , vol. 7 , no. 1 , pp. 31-46 . https://doi.org/10.3366/sound.2017.0095en
dc.identifier.issn2042-8855
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 247757394
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: bf53ced0-2498-4f29-ac64-c3cbdb3b6912
dc.identifier.otherWOS: 000406050900003
dc.identifier.otherORCID: /0000-0002-4029-7465/work/61978877
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10023/10408
dc.description.abstractDiscussion of cinematic affect most typically attends to response, the impact of the film as we experience it. In this vein, various writers have drawn attention to the physicality of hearing (Sobchack 2005; Cubitt 1998), while others have illuminated the ways in which sound communicates sensory information about the film world (Altman 1992; Chion 1994). However, attention to practice offers further opportunities to think about affect, that decisions made by sound practitioners take into account such considerations; sound practitioners frequently speak about their work in terms of feel, texture and experience. Moreover, the processes of creating film sound requires physical activity and involvement, play and experimentation, which might be literally physical, or have a kind of tactile analogy (to weaving, sculpting and so on). In this sense, affect is in the labour of making the film, as well as in our watching of it. Bringing together theory and practice therefore offers an opportunity to more fully develop an account of the particular contributions of sound to cinematic affect, and perhaps illuminate the significance of practitioners work to the sensory appeal of film more generally – highlighting the creative effort of those filmmakers who traditionally receive less recognition for their achievements. Drawing on published and unpublished interviews with film sound personnel, this article will seek to show how a connection between theory and practice enables a deeper comprehension of filmic affect, traced through the embodied and empathetic qualities of sound work.
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofThe New Soundtracken
dc.rights© Edinburgh University Press and Lucy Fife Donaldson. This work has been made available online in accordance with the publisher’s policies. This is the author created, accepted version manuscript following peer review and may differ slightly from the final published version. The final published version of this work is available at: https://doi.org/10.3366/sound.2017.0095en
dc.subjectSound designen
dc.subjectAffecten
dc.subjectEmbodimenten
dc.subjectMaterialityen
dc.subjectSensory cinemaen
dc.subjectSound practiceen
dc.subjectPN1993 Motion Picturesen
dc.subjectT-NDASen
dc.subjectBDCen
dc.subject.lccPN1993en
dc.titleFeeling and filmmaking : the design and affect of film sounden
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.description.versionPostprinten
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews.Film Studiesen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews.Centre for Ancient Environmental Studiesen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.3366/sound.2017.0095
dc.description.statusPeer revieweden
dc.date.embargoedUntil2017-02-23


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