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dc.contributor.authorMicheletti, Alberto J. C.
dc.contributor.authorRuxton, Graeme D.
dc.contributor.authorGardner, Andy
dc.date.accessioned2017-02-23T10:30:10Z
dc.date.available2017-02-23T10:30:10Z
dc.date.issued2017-02-22
dc.identifier.citationMicheletti , A J C , Ruxton , G D & Gardner , A 2017 , ' Intrafamily and intragenomic conflicts in human warfare ' Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences , vol. 284 , no. 1849 . DOI: 10.1098/rspb.2016.2699en
dc.identifier.issn0962-8452
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 249027473
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: b00f6555-5122-496e-8f72-a8ef24f3626c
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 85013779304
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10023/10337
dc.identifier.urihttp://rspb.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/284/1849/20162699.article-infoen
dc.descriptionA.J.C.M. is supported by a Ph.D. studentship from the School of Biology, University of St Andrews, and A.G. is supported by a Natural Environment Research Council Independent Research Fellowship (NE/K009524/1).en
dc.description.abstractRecent years have seen an explosion of multidisciplinary interest in ancient human warfare. Theory has emphasised a key role for kin-selected cooperation, modulated by sex-specific demography, in explaining intergroup violence. However, conflicts of interest remain a relatively underexplored factor in the evolutionary-ecological study of warfare, with little consideration given to which parties influence the decision to go to war and how their motivation may differ. We develop a mathematical model to investigate the interplay between sex-specific demography and human warfare, showing that: the ecology of warfare drives the evolution of sex-biased dispersal; sex-biased dispersal modulates intrafamily and intragenomic conflicts in relation to warfare; intragenomic conflict drives parent-of-origin-specific patterns of gene expression – i.e. “genomic imprinting” – in relation to warfare phenotypes; and an ecological perspective of conflicts at the levels of the gene, individual and social group yields novel predictions as to pathologies associated with mutations and epimutations at loci underpinning human violence.en
dc.format.extent10en
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofProceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciencesen
dc.rights© 2017 The Authors. Published by the Royal Society under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/, which permits unrestricted use, provided the original author and source are credited.en
dc.subjectWaren
dc.subjectSex-biased dispersalen
dc.subjectParent-offspring conflicten
dc.subjectSexual conflicten
dc.subjectIntragenomic conflicten
dc.subjectGenomic imprintingen
dc.subjectGF Human ecology. Anthropogeographyen
dc.subjectQA Mathematicsen
dc.subjectQH301 Biologyen
dc.subjectT-NDASen
dc.subject.lccGFen
dc.subject.lccQAen
dc.subject.lccQH301en
dc.titleIntrafamily and intragenomic conflicts in human warfareen
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.description.versionPublisher PDFen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews. School of Biologyen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews. Centre for Biological Diversityen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2016.2699
dc.description.statusPeer revieweden


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