Show simple item record

Files in this item

Thumbnail

Item metadata

dc.contributor.authorRapport, Nigel
dc.date.accessioned2017-02-15T10:30:15Z
dc.date.available2017-02-15T10:30:15Z
dc.date.issued2017-03-27
dc.identifier.citationRapport , N 2017 , ' Being undisciplined : doing justice to the immensity of human experience ' The Sociological Review , vol. 65 , no. 1 , pp. 196-204 . https://doi.org/10.1177/0081176917693552en
dc.identifier.issn0038-0261
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 248985529
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: b9248615-9c48-40e8-b0a1-846ce09eb9ca
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 85044095854
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10023/10299
dc.description.abstractThis monograph has been an appraisal of the anthropology of Britain as a project. In this final piece, the volume is reviewed and an argument is made along Kierkegaardian lines. Human life is an inward, personal adventure, of each in the face of the other: life is individual and possessed of infinite depth. Conducting social-scientific research (whether ‘anthropological’ or ‘sociological’) in a language – verbal, gestural and conventional – with which the researcher is ‘at home’ enables that individual and inward life, and its public and social dimensions, to be apprehended with a subtlety and sophistication far more difficult to acquire in ‘foreign’ settings. Anthropology ‘at home’ is ideally placed to differentiate between the cultural forms of life, the social structures of life, and how these are individually inhabited and personally experienced. To do justice to human life – descriptive, analytic – is to apprehend an immensity – a complexity and contrariety – beyond the delimitings of partial labels and categories, even beyond particular disciplines of study.en
dc.format.extent9en
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofThe Sociological Reviewen
dc.rightsCopyright © 2017, Sociological Review Publication Limited. This work is made available online in accordance with the publisher’s policies. This is the author created, accepted version manuscript following peer review and may differ slightly from the final published version. The final published version of this work is available at https://doi.org/10.1177/0081176917693552en
dc.subjectBritainen
dc.subjectLabelsen
dc.subjectExistenceen
dc.subjectIndividualityen
dc.subjectWorld-viewen
dc.subjectLife-projecten
dc.subjectSymbolic interpretationen
dc.subjectGN Anthropologyen
dc.subjectT-NDASen
dc.subject.lccGNen
dc.titleBeing undisciplined : doing justice to the immensity of human experienceen
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.description.versionPostprinten
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews. Social Anthropologyen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews. St Andrews Centre for Exoplanet Scienceen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews. School of Philosophical, Anthropological and Film Studiesen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1177/0081176917693552
dc.description.statusPeer revieweden


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record