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dc.contributor.authorSlater, Donald Alexander
dc.contributor.authorNienow, Peter
dc.contributor.authorSole, Andrew
dc.contributor.authorCowton, Tom
dc.contributor.authorMottram, Ruth
dc.contributor.authorLangen, Peter
dc.contributor.authorMair, Douglas
dc.date.accessioned2017-02-07T13:30:37Z
dc.date.available2017-02-07T13:30:37Z
dc.date.issued2017-04
dc.identifier.citationSlater , D A , Nienow , P , Sole , A , Cowton , T , Mottram , R , Langen , P & Mair , D 2017 , ' Spatially distributed runoff at the grounding line of a large Greenlandic tidewater glacier inferred from plume modelling ' , Journal of Glaciology , vol. 63 , no. 238 , pp. 309-323 . https://doi.org/10.1017/jog.2016.139en
dc.identifier.issn0022-1430
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 248138426
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: 36592cfe-c9a7-42a6-ba81-290ab035eaa9
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 85014618765
dc.identifier.otherORCID: /0000-0003-1668-7372/work/60427782
dc.identifier.otherWOS: 000396124800008
dc.identifier.otherORCID: /0000-0001-8394-6149/work/70619151
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10023/10244
dc.descriptionDAS is supported by a UK Natural Environmental Research Council PhD studentship. The authors acknowledge NERC Grants NE/K015249/1 and NE/F021399/1 (to PWN), NE/K014609/1 (to AJS) and NE/H024964/1 (to DWFM). The research leading to these results has also received funding (to RHM and PLL) from the European Research Council under the European Community's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) / ERC grant agreement 610055 as part of the ice2ice project. Data from the Programme for Monitoring of the Greenland Ice Sheet (PROMICE) were provided by the Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland (GEUS) at http://www.promice.dk.en
dc.description.abstractUnderstanding the drivers of recent change at Greenlandic tidewater glaciers is of great importance if we are to predict how these glaciers will respond to climatic warming. A poorly constrained component of tidewater glacier processes is the near-terminus subglacial hydrology. Here we present a novel method for constraining near-terminus subglacial hydrology with application to marine-terminating Kangiata Nunata Sermia in south- west Greenland. By simulating proglacial plume dynamics using buoyant plume theory and a general circulation model, we assess the critical subglacial discharge, if delivered through a single compact channel, required to generate a plume which reaches the fjord surface. We then compare catchment runoff to a time series of plume visibility acquired from a time-lapse camera. We identify extended periods throughout the 2009 melt season where catchment runoff significantly exceeds the discharge required for a plume to reach the fjord surface, yet we observe no plume. We attribute these observations to spatial spreading of runoff across the grounding line. Persistent distributed drainage near the terminus would lead to more spatially homogeneous submarine melting and may promote more rapid basal sliding during warmer summers, potentially providing a mechanism independent of ocean forcing for increases in atmospheric temperature to drive tidewater glacier acceleration.
dc.format.extent15
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Glaciologyen
dc.rightsCOPYRIGHT: © The Author(s) 2017 This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.en
dc.subjectGlacier hydrologyen
dc.subjectIce/ocean interactionsen
dc.subjectSubglacial processesen
dc.subjectGE Environmental Sciencesen
dc.subject3rd-DASen
dc.subject.lccGEen
dc.titleSpatially distributed runoff at the grounding line of a large Greenlandic tidewater glacier inferred from plume modellingen
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.description.versionPublisher PDFen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews.School of Geography & Sustainable Developmenten
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews.Geography & Sustainable Developmenten
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews.Bell-Edwards Geographic Data Instituteen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1017/jog.2016.139
dc.description.statusPeer revieweden


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