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dc.contributor.authorPritchard, David James
dc.contributor.authorHurly, T. Andrew
dc.contributor.authorTello-Ramos, Maria Cristina
dc.contributor.authorHealy, Susan Denise
dc.date.accessioned2017-01-19T00:32:24Z
dc.date.available2017-01-19T00:32:24Z
dc.date.issued2016-01-18
dc.identifier.citationPritchard , D J , Hurly , T A , Tello-Ramos , M C & Healy , S D 2016 , ' Why study cognition in the wild (and how to test it)? ' , Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior , vol. 105 , no. 1 , pp. 41-55 . https://doi.org/10.1002/jeab.195en
dc.identifier.issn1938-3711
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 242239769
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: 96f76e11-ce71-4665-8f31-54d52f405fe9
dc.identifier.otherBibtex: urn:8c7e2e0884643aa92268452083923836
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 85011004531
dc.identifier.otherORCID: /0000-0002-8059-4480/work/60631271
dc.identifier.otherWOS: 000372993900005
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10023/10123
dc.description.abstractAn animal's behavior is affected by its cognitive abilities, which are, in turn, a consequence of the environment in which an animal has evolved and developed. Although behavioral ecologists have been studying animals in their natural environment for several decades, over much the same period animal cognition has been studied almost exclusively in the laboratory. Traditionally, the study of animal cognition has been based on well-established paradigms used to investigate well-defined cognitive processes. This allows identification of what animals can do, but may not, however, always reflect what animals actually do in the wild. As both ecologists and some psychologists increasingly try to explain behaviors observable only in wild animals, we review the different motivations and methodologies used to study cognition in the wild and identify some of the challenges that accompany the combination of a naturalistic approach together with typical psychological testing paradigms. We think that studying animal cognition in the wild is likely to be most productive when the questions addressed correspond to the species’ ecology and when laboratory cognitive tests are appropriately adapted for use in the field. Furthermore, recent methodological and technological advances will likely allow significant expansion of the species and questions that can be addressed in the wild.
dc.format.extent15
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavioren
dc.rights© 2016 Society for the Experimental Analysis of Behavior. This work is made available online in accordance with the publisher’s policies. This is the author created, accepted version manuscript following peer review and may differ slightly from the final published version. The final published version of this work is available at https://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jeab.195en
dc.rights© 2016 Society for the Experimental Analysis of Behavior. This work is made available online in accordance with the publisher’s policies. This is the author created, accepted version manuscript following peer review and may differ slightly from the final published version. The final published version of this work is available at https://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jeab.195en
dc.subjectField experimentsen
dc.subjectSpatial cognitionen
dc.subjectTimingen
dc.subjectComparative cognitionen
dc.subjectBehavioral ecologyen
dc.subjectCognitive ecologyen
dc.subjectQH301 Biologyen
dc.subject.lccQH301en
dc.titleWhy study cognition in the wild (and how to test it)?en
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.description.versionPostprinten
dc.description.versionPostprinten
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews. School of Biologyen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews. Institute of Behavioural and Neural Sciencesen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews. Centre for Social Learning & Cognitive Evolutionen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews. Centre for Biological Diversityen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1002/jeab.195
dc.description.statusPeer revieweden
dc.date.embargoedUntil2017-01-18


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