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dc.contributor.authorMaccagno, Paolo
dc.coverage.spatial28en_US
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-14T11:20:31Z
dc.date.available2015-08-14T11:20:31Z
dc.date.issued2015-06-26
dc.identifier.citationMaccagno, P., (2015). Practitioner report: Running walls: the performance of the limit in prison. Scottish Journal of Performance, 2(2), pp. 33–59.en_US
dc.identifier.issn2054-1961en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10023/7226
dc.description.abstractThe limit to freedom, represented by the wall of the prison, is the limit to run to reach the finish-line of the marathon: run the limit! Training prisoners to run a marathon as a practice of the limit. Inside and outside meet on the limit, in a suspended place where running is a movement of rehabilitation and transformation. Go Daddy! is an educational project based upon the pedagogy of resilience and a form of anthropological research into body and movement. It is a case study investigating personal limits through an art performance based on marathon running with prisoner-fathers; a limit- experience as a ‘practice of freedom’ (Foucault) to activate the prison and through it see a social system where neoliberalism is expressed; a pilot project for wider research at the intersection of different academic traditions, pointing towards a new direction for critical engagement with performance. Drawing from that experience, this article examines the potentialities of marathon running in prison as a performance of limits: a healing possibility for personhood to be based on ‘presence’ (Abramović) and awareness, since, as Foucault notes, the experiential body can become a locus of resistance against normalising power . Through analysis of the Go Daddy! project, this paper considers how an art performance can be an experiment in the sense not of testing a hypothesis but of opening an exploratory path of inquiry into human life and a new way of conducting anthropology as a learning process —in other words, the possibility for art to be science.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherThe Royal Conservatoire of Scotlanden_US
dc.relation.ispartofScottish Journal of Performanceen_US
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectMarathonen_US
dc.subjectRunningen_US
dc.subjectPrisonen_US
dc.subjectWallsen_US
dc.subjectPresenceen_US
dc.subjectLimiten_US
dc.subject.lccPN1576en_US
dc.subject.lcshPerforming arts--Researchen_US
dc.titlePractitioner report: running walls: the performance of the limit in prisonen_US
dc.typeReporten_US
dc.description.versionPublisher PDFen_US
dc.publicationstatusPublisheden_US
dc.statusPeer revieweden_US
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.14439/sjop.2015.0202.03en


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