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dc.contributor.advisorCrook, Tony
dc.contributor.authorLind, Craig
dc.coverage.spatial294en_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-08-12T13:29:27Z
dc.date.available2011-08-12T13:29:27Z
dc.date.issued2011-06
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10023/1972
dc.description.abstractThis is a study of coming to know what it is to be Paamese. The work seeks to present an anthropological understanding of ontological concerns that constitute a Paamese perception of subjectivities. I take my lead from Paamese perceptions that the internal capacities of subjects or “things” (e.g. persons, villages, islands, and movement itself) are revealed through relations with others. This correlates with anthropology’s methodology of testing its analytical strategies through the ethnographic practices of others in order to reach more accurate representations. Paamese, as is common elsewhere in Vanuatu and Melanesia, have an extremely fluid attitude towards sociality and easily accommodate urban dwelling without leaving Paama behind. I suggest that a nuanced multi-positioned approach in which several aspects of Paamese sociality are considered from a point of limitation employed by Paamese to focus an event, such as a marriage exchange, will present a better understanding of how these subjectivities, that is Paamese people and Paama Island, adhere such that they do not part company wherever they go. Paamese suggest that each event should be considered as if following a single branch in the canopy of a tree – a scalable perception that offers the promise that a multi-faceted approach will reveal a replicable form. I take this approach to specificity seriously and employ a looping aesthetic, measi, adapted from Paamese sand-drawing in order to consider the shifting concerns expressed by Paamese perceptions of out (place), āmal (agnatic clans), sise (road), vatte (origin), ara (blood) and asi (bone). I suggest that these, parts, can be considered together as a holography for how to come to know what it is to be Paamese.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherUniversity of St Andrews
dc.subjectPaamaen_US
dc.subjectPaameseen_US
dc.subjectVanuatuen_US
dc.subjectMelanesiaen_US
dc.subjectPlaceen_US
dc.subjectPersonhooden_US
dc.subjectGenderen_US
dc.subjectMovementen_US
dc.subjectStasisen_US
dc.subjectName (isen)en_US
dc.subjectSand drawingen_US
dc.subjectNew Melanesia ethnographyen_US
dc.subjectAnalogicen_US
dc.subjectRoad (sise)en_US
dc.subjectOrigin (vatte)en_US
dc.subjectCorporealityen_US
dc.subjectThingen_US
dc.subjectPort Vilaen_US
dc.subjectSeasideen_US
dc.subjectUrbanen_US
dc.subjectRuralen_US
dc.subjectKinshipen_US
dc.subjectExchangeen_US
dc.subjectAgnatic clanen_US
dc.subjectNamingen_US
dc.subjectKastomen_US
dc.subjectSocialityen_US
dc.subjectLopevien_US
dc.subjectSiblingen_US
dc.subjectMother's brotheren_US
dc.subject.lccGN671.N6L5
dc.subject.lcshThesis restricted in accordance with University regulationsen_US
dc.subject.lcshEthnicity--Vanuatu--Paamaen_US
dc.subject.lcshPaama (Vanuatu)--Social life and customsen_US
dc.subject.lcshEthnology--Vanuatu--Paamaen_US
dc.titlePlacing Paamese : locating concerns with place, gender and movement in Vanuatuen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.sponsorEconomic and Social Research Council (ESRC)en_US
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoralen_US
dc.type.qualificationnamePhD Doctor of Philosophyen_US
dc.publisher.institutionThe University of St Andrewsen_US
dc.rights.embargodate2020-01-20en_US
dc.rights.embargoreasonThesis restricted in accordance with University regulations. Electronic version restricted until 20th January 2020en_US


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