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dc.contributor.advisorRobertson, E. F.
dc.contributor.advisorO'Connor, John J. (John Joseph)
dc.contributor.authorHartveit, Marit
dc.coverage.spatial243en_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-03-18T08:21:33Z
dc.date.available2011-03-18T08:21:33Z
dc.date.issued2011-06-22
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10023/1700
dc.description.abstractThe Edinburgh Mathematical Society started out in 1883 as a society with a large proportion of teachers. Today, the member base is mainly academical and there are only a few teachers left. This thesis explores how and when this change came about, and discusses what this meant for the Society. It argues that the exit of the teachers is related to the rising standard of mathematics, but even more to a change in the Society’s printing policy in the 1920s, that turned the Society’s Proceedings into a pure research publication and led to the death of the ‘teacher journal’, the Mathematical Notes. The thesis also argues that this change, drastic as it may seem, does not represent a change in the Society’s nature. For this aim, the role of the teachers within the Society has been studied and compared to that of the academics, from 1883 to 1946. The mathematical contribution of the teachers to the Proceedings is studied in some detail, in particular the papers by John Watt Butters. A paper in the Mathematical Notes by A. C. Aitken on the Bell numbers is considered in connection with a series of letters on the same topic from 1938–39. These letters, written by Aitken, Sir D’Arcy Thompson, another EMS member, and the Cambridge mathematician G. T. Bennett, explores the relation between the three and gives valuable insight into the status of the Notes. Finally, the role of the first women in the Society is studied. The first woman joined without any official university education, but had received the necessary mathematical background from her studies under the Edinburgh Association for the University Education of Women. The final chapter is largely an assessment of this Association’s mathematical classes.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherUniversity of St Andrews
dc.subjectEdinburgh Mathematical Societyen_US
dc.subjectMathematical publicationen_US
dc.subjectA. C. Aitkenen_US
dc.subjectSir D'Arcy Thompsonen_US
dc.subjectG. T. Bennetten_US
dc.subjectEdinburgh Association for the University Education of Womenen_US
dc.subjectJohn Watt Buttersen_US
dc.subjectScottish mathematicsen_US
dc.subjectMathematical teachersen_US
dc.subject.lccQA1.E4H2
dc.subject.lcshEdinburgh Mathematical Society--Historyen_US
dc.subject.lcshMathematics teachers--Scotland--Historyen_US
dc.subject.lcshMathematics--Research--Scotland--Historyen_US
dc.subject.lcshMathematics--Scotland--Historyen_US
dc.titleThe lesser names : the teachers of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society and other aspects of Scottish mathematics, 1867–1946en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoralen_US
dc.type.qualificationnamePhD Doctor of Philosophyen_US
dc.publisher.institutionThe University of St Andrewsen_US
dc.publisher.departmentSchool of Mathematics and Statisticsen_US


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