Show simple item record

Files in this item

FilesSizeFormatView

There are no files associated with this item.

Item metadata

dc.contributor.advisorCrook, Tony
dc.contributor.authorSantos da Costa, Priscila
dc.coverage.spatial327 p.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-06-26T09:01:54Z
dc.date.available2018-06-26T09:01:54Z
dc.date.issued2018-06-28
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10023/14580
dc.description.abstractMy thesis addresses how Christianity can constitute itself as a creative force and a form of governance across different scales. I carried out 12 months of fieldwork between 2013 and 2015 in Papua New Guinea’s National Parliament (Port Moresby). My interlocutors were bureaucrats, liberal professionals and pastors who formed a group known as the Unity Team. The Unity Team, spearheaded by the Speaker of the 9th Parliament, Hon. Theodor Zurenuoc, were responsible for controversial initiatives, such as the destruction and dismantling of traditional carvings from Parliament in 2013, which they considered ungodly and evil, and the placement of a donated KJV Bible in the chamber of Parliament in 2015. My interlocutors regard Christianity as central to eliciting modern subjects and institutions. They consider Christianity to be a universal form of discernment, contrasted to particularistic forms of knowing and relating which are thought to create corruption and low institutional performance. I show how the Unity Team regarded Christianity as more than a way of doing away with satanic forces and building a Christian self. They expected Christianity to be a frame of reference informing work ethics, infusing citizenship and, finally, productive of a public and national realm. By exploring Christianity ethnographically, I offer a contribution to Anthropological discussions concerning politics, bureaucracy, citizenship, and nation-making.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherUniversity of St Andrews
dc.subjectPoliticsen_US
dc.subjectReligionen_US
dc.subjectBureaucracyen_US
dc.subjectCitizenshipen_US
dc.subjectNationalismen_US
dc.subjectChristianityen_US
dc.subjectPentecostalismen_US
dc.subjectGovernanceen_US
dc.subjectEthicsen_US
dc.subjectParliamenten_US
dc.subjectPostcolonial critiqueen_US
dc.subjectNation-makingen_US
dc.subjectTemporalityen_US
dc.subjectPersonhooden_US
dc.subjectInstitutionsen_US
dc.subjectUrban studiesen_US
dc.subjectPolitical theoryen_US
dc.subjectCultureen_US
dc.subject.lccDU740.8S2
dc.subject.lcshChristianity and politics--Papua New Guineaen
dc.subject.lcshPapua New Guinea--Politics and government--1975-en
dc.subject.lcshReligion and politics--Papua New Guineaen
dc.title"Re-designing the nation" : politics and Christianity in Papua New Guinea's national parliamenten_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.sponsorUniversity of St Andrews. Department of Social Anthropologyen_US
dc.contributor.sponsorRussell Trusten_US
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoralen_US
dc.type.qualificationnamePhD Doctor of Philosophyen_US
dc.publisher.institutionThe University of St Andrewsen_US
dc.rights.embargodate2020-06-11
dc.rights.embargoreasonThesis restricted in accordance with University regulations. Print and electronic copy restricted until 11th June 2020en


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record