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dc.contributor.advisorBeedham, Christopher
dc.contributor.advisorCobham, Catherine
dc.contributor.authorDanks, Warwick
dc.coverage.spatial437 p.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2010-07-05T11:04:20Z
dc.date.available2010-07-05T11:04:20Z
dc.date.issued2010-06-24
dc.identifieruk.bl.ethos.552378
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10023/961
dc.descriptionAlso published: Amsterdam : John Benjamins, 2011 (http://dx.doi.org/10.1075/sfsl.63)en_US
dc.description.abstractThe research presented in this dissertation adopts an empirical Saussurean structuralist approach to elucidating the true meaning of the verb patterns characterised formally by vowel lengthening in Modern Standard Arabic (MSA). The verbal system as a whole is examined in order to place the patterns of interest (III and VI) in context, the complexities of Arabic verbal morphology are explored and the challenges revealed by previous attempts to draw links between form and meaning are presented. An exhaustive dictionary survey is employed to provide quantifiable data to empirically test the largely accepted view that the vowel lengthening patterns have mutual/reciprocal meaning. Finding the traditional explanation inadequate and prone to too many exceptions, alternative commonalities of meaning are similarly investigated. Whilst confirming the detransitivising function of the ta- prefix which derives pattern VI from pattern III, analysis of valency data also precludes transitivity as a viable explanation for pattern III meaning compared with the base form. Examination of formally similar morphology in certain nouns leads to the intuitive possibility that vowel lengthening has aspectual meaning. A model of linguistic aspect is investigated for its applicability to MSA and used to isolate the aspectual feature common to the majority of pattern III and pattern VI verbs, which is determined to be atelicity. A set of verbs which appear to be exceptional in that they are not attributable to atelic aspectual categories is found to be characterised by inceptive meaning and a three-phase model of event time structure is developed to include an inceptive verbal category, demonstrating that these verbs too are atelic. Thus the form-meaning relationship which is discovered is that the vowel lengthening verbal patterns in Modern Standard Arabic have atelic aspectual meaning.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relationOlsen, Mari Broman. 1997. A semantic and pragmatic model of lexical and grammatical aspect. New York: Garland.en_US
dc.relationBeedham, Christopher. 2005. Language and meaning: The structural creation of reality. Amsterdam: John Benjamins.en_US
dc.subjectMorphologyen_US
dc.subjectSemanticsen_US
dc.subjectAspecten_US
dc.subjectTransitivityen_US
dc.subjectMutualityen_US
dc.subjectReciprocityen_US
dc.subjectValencyen_US
dc.subjectModern Standard Arabicen_US
dc.subjectSyntaxen_US
dc.subjectLexical exceptionsen_US
dc.subjectSaussureen_US
dc.subjectDescriptive linguisticsen_US
dc.subjectStructuralismen_US
dc.subjectPattern IIIen_US
dc.subjectPattern VIen_US
dc.subjectAtelicityen_US
dc.subject.lccPJ6145.D2
dc.subject.lcshArabic language--Verben_US
dc.subject.lcshArabic language--Morphologyen_US
dc.subject.lcshArabic language--Semanticsen_US
dc.subject.lcshArabic language--Aspecten_US
dc.subject.lcshArabic language--Transitivityen_US
dc.titleThe Arabic verb : form and meaning in the vowel-lengthening patternsen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoralen_US
dc.type.qualificationnamePhD Doctor of Philosophyen_US
dc.publisher.institutionThe University of St Andrewsen_US
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1075/sfsl.63


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