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dc.contributor.advisorWoolf, Alex
dc.contributor.authorMcGuigan, Neil
dc.coverage.spatialxxx, 345 p.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2015-11-23T14:12:00Z
dc.date.available2015-11-23T14:12:00Z
dc.date.issued2015-11-30
dc.identifieruk.bl.ethos.675224
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10023/7829
dc.description.abstractIn and around the 870s, Britain was transformed dramatically by the campaigns and settlements of the Great Army and its allies. Some pre-existing political communities suffered less than others, and in hindsight the process helped Scotland and England achieve their later positions. By the twelfth century, the rulers of these countries had partitioned the former kingdom of Northumbria. This thesis is about what happened in the intervening period, the fate of Northumbria’s political structures, and how the settlement that defined Britain for the remainder of the Middle Ages came about. Modern reconstructions of the era have tended to be limited in scope and based on unreliable post-1100 sources. The aim is to use contemporary material to overcome such limitations, and reach positive conclusions that will make more sense of the evidence and make the region easier to understand for a wider audience, particularly in regard to its shadowy polities and ecclesiastical structures. After an overview of the most important evidence, two chapters will review Northumbria’s alleged dissolution, testing existing historiographic beliefs (based largely on Anglo-Norman-era evidence) about the fate of the monarchy, political community, and episcopate. The impact and nature of ‘Southenglish’ hegemony on the region’s political communities will be the focus of the fourth chapter, while the fifth will look at evidence for the expansion of Scottish political power. The sixth chapter will try to draw positive conclusions about the episcopate, leaving the final chapter to look in more detail at the institutions that produced the final settlement.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherUniversity of St Andrews
dc.subjectNorthumbriaen_US
dc.subjectLothianen_US
dc.subjectMedieval Scotlanden_US
dc.subjectAnglo-Scottish Borderen_US
dc.subjectBamburghen_US
dc.subjectViking Ageen_US
dc.subjectSymeon of Durhamen_US
dc.subjectAnglo-Normansen_US
dc.subjectUí Ímairen_US
dc.subjectEadwulfingsen_US
dc.subjectKingdom of Strathclydeen_US
dc.subjectHistoria Regumen_US
dc.subjectLibellus de Exordioen_US
dc.subjectHistoria de Sancto Cuthbertoen_US
dc.subjectNorhamen_US
dc.subjectCeltic Studiesen_US
dc.subjectAnglo-Saxon studiesen_US
dc.subjectHistorical writingen_US
dc.subjectSt Cuthberten_US
dc.subjectDurhamen_US
dc.subjectNorthern Englanden_US
dc.subjectScottish Bordersen_US
dc.subjectGallowayen_US
dc.subjectCumbriaen_US
dc.subjectEcclesiastical historyen_US
dc.subjectScottish Churchen_US
dc.subjectScoto-Normansen_US
dc.subjectForthen_US
dc.subjectTweed Basinen_US
dc.subjectTeviotdaleen_US
dc.subjectFlemingsen_US
dc.subjectHenry Ien_US
dc.subjectDavid Ien_US
dc.subjectWilliam Rufusen_US
dc.subjectGall-Ghàidheilen_US
dc.subjectWestmoringasen_US
dc.subjectState formationen_US
dc.subjectBritish historyen_US
dc.subject.lccDA670.N8M4
dc.subject.lcshNorthumbria (Kingdom)--History--To 1500en_US
dc.subject.lcshNorthumbria (Kingdom)--Politics and government--To 1500en_US
dc.subject.lcshNorthumbria (Kingdom)--Church history--To 1500en_US
dc.subject.lcshNorthumbria (Kingdom)--Historiographyen_US
dc.titleNeither Scotland nor England : Middle Britain, c.850–1150en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoralen_US
dc.type.qualificationnamePhD Doctor of Philosophyen_US
dc.publisher.institutionThe University of St Andrewsen_US
dc.publisher.departmentSt Andrews Institute for Mediaeval Studies, St Andrews Institute of Scottish Historical Researchen_US


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