Show simple item record

Files in this item

Thumbnail

Item metadata

dc.contributor.authorMarshall, Warren
dc.date.accessioned2014-10-29T16:31:12Z
dc.date.available2014-10-29T16:31:12Z
dc.date.issued2010-11-30
dc.identifier.citationMarshall, W. (2010). Al-Qaeda in Gaza: isolating “the base”. Journal of Terrorism Research, 1(1), pp. 54-69.en_US
dc.identifier.issn2049-7040en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://ojs.st-andrews.ac.uk/index.php/jtr/article/view/167en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10023/5610
dc.description.abstractIn 1996, Osama bin Laden declared jihad against the American forces occupying Saudi Arabia, calling for Muslims to expel the infidels from the “land of the two holy places.” The first sacred ground mentioned in this statement, however, was not Saudi Arabia but Palestine. His words seething with hatred, bin Laden scorned the Arab regimes for failing to recapture Jerusalem and described the situation as a festering wound upon the Islamic umma.[1] Fourteen years later, even after orchestrating devastating attacks in three Western capitals, Bin Laden’s al-Qaeda is still unable to do much against Israel besides issuing scathing diatribes. Its most vigorous efforts to establish itself in the Palestinian arena have been in the Gaza Strip. Here, however, al-Qaeda-linked groups are stymied by a perhaps surprising adversary: Hamas. But despite Hamas’s efforts to suppress them, Salafi-jihadi groups maintain an underground presence. Even if al-Qaeda affiliates remain weak operationally in comparison to Hamas, al-Qaeda’s ideology of global jihad seems to be on the rise in Gaza. Meanwhile, the al-Qaeda leadership is relentless in pursuing new and ingenious ways for its agents to penetrate the Strip. A Hamas weakened by a tightened blockade or another war with Israel would leave an opening for Salafi-jihadi militants. The prospect of these al-Qaeda-linked factions upsetting a fragile peace needs to be considered among the many other factors relevant to engagement with Hamas.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherCentre for the Study of Terrorism and Political Violence, University of St Andrewsen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Terrorism Researchen_US
dc.rightsThis is an open access article published in Journal of Terrorism Research. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/)en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/
dc.subjectAl-Qaedaen_US
dc.subject.lccHV6431en_US
dc.subject.lcshTerrorismen_US
dc.titleAl-Qaeda in Gaza: isolating “the base”en_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.description.versionPublisher PDFen_US
dc.publicationstatusPublisheden_US
dc.statusPeer revieweden_US
dc.identifier.doihttp://doi.org/10.15664/jtr.167en


The following license files are associated with this item:

  • Creative Commons

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

This is an open access article published in Journal of Terrorism Research. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/)
Except where otherwise noted within the work, this item's license for re-use is described as This is an open access article published in Journal of Terrorism Research. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/)