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dc.contributor.authorSosis, Richard
dc.date.accessioned2013-09-02T15:33:33Z
dc.date.available2013-09-02T15:33:33Z
dc.date.issued2011-02-02
dc.identifier.citationSosis, R. (2011). Why sacred lands are not indivisible: the cognitive foundations of sacralising land. Journal of Terrorism Research, 2(1), pp. 17-44.en_US
dc.identifier.issn2049-7040en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://ojs.st-andrews.ac.uk/index.php/jtr/article/view/172en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10023/4034
dc.description.abstractNumerous political analysts have argued that conflicts over sacred land are intractable. These scholars maintain that sacred lands are psychologically perceived as indivisible, or alternatively, in the sociological tradition, their indivisibility is a social fact. Moreover, religious beliefs are viewed as stagnant and resistant to change. Consequently, resolving such conflicts is fraught with difficulty, and even if a truce could be imposed, it would be unstable and violence would eventually erupt. A cognitive and evolutionary account offers a less pessimistic view. Individuals do not conceive of sacred lands in the same way that they conceive of sacred space, such as cemeteries or houses of worship, or sacred objects, such as holy water or prayer beads. Unlike sacred space and objects, whose boundaries are clearly defined, conceptions of sacred land are typically abstract and may bear little resemblance to the contested physical land. While abstract notions of sacred land are indivisible and must remain intact, the physical land is not indivisible, and therefore there is often greater room for negotiation of sacred lands than is generally appreciated.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherCentre for the Study of Terrorism and Political Violence, University of St Andrewsen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Terrorism Researchen_US
dc.rightsThis is an open access article published in Journal of Terrorism Research. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/)en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/
dc.subjectReligionen_US
dc.subject.lccHV6431en_US
dc.subject.lcshTerrorismen_US
dc.titleWhy sacred lands are not indivisible: the cognitive foundations of sacralising landen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.description.versionPublisher PDFen_US
dc.publicationstatusPublisheden_US
dc.statusPeer revieweden_US
dc.identifier.doihttp://doi.org/10.15664/jtr.172en


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This is an open access article published in Journal of Terrorism Research. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/)
Except where otherwise noted within the work, this item's license for re-use is described as This is an open access article published in Journal of Terrorism Research. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/)