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dc.contributor.authorCoccia, Mario
dc.date.accessioned2018-10-16T10:16:34Z
dc.date.available2018-10-16T10:16:34Z
dc.date.issued2018-05-03
dc.identifier.citationCoccia, M., 2018. Terrorism Driven by High Population Growth. Contemporary Voices: St Andrews Journal of International Relations, 1(1), pp.1–13. DOI: http://doi.org/10.15664/jtr.1469en_US
dc.identifier.issn2516-3159en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10023/16223
dc.description.abstractA fundamental problem in conflict studies is how to explain the root causes of terrorism. This study suggests that terrorism thrives in specific regions with high growth rates of population that may generate income inequality and relative deprivation of people. In addition, geospatial analysis here reveals that countries with high association between fatalities for terrorist incidents and population growth are mainly in Sub-Saharan Africa, North Africa, Middle East, East and South Asia. Overall, then, one of the causes of terrorism is due to sociodemographic factors combined with psychosocial risk factors.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherSchool of International Relations, University of St Andrewsen_US
dc.relation.ispartofContemporary Voices: St Andrews Journal of International Relationsen_US
dc.rightsCopyright (c) the author. This is an open access article published in Contemporary Voices: St Andrews Journal of International Relations. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/)en_US
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/*
dc.subjectTerrorismen_US
dc.subjectPopulation growthen_US
dc.subjectDemographic factorsen_US
dc.subjectIncome inequalityen_US
dc.subjectPovertyen_US
dc.subjectRelative deprivationen_US
dc.subjectPsychosocial risk factorsen_US
dc.subject.lccJZen_US
dc.subject.lcshInternational relationsen_US
dc.titleTerrorism driven by high population growthen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.description.versionPublisher PDFen_US
dc.publicationstatusPublisheden_US
dc.statusPeer revieweden_US
dc.identifier.doihttp://doi.org/10.15664/jtr.1469en


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    Copyright (c) the author. This is an open access article published in Contemporary Voices: St Andrews Journal of International Relations. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/)
    Except where otherwise noted within the work, this item's license for re-use is described as Copyright (c) the author. This is an open access article published in Contemporary Voices: St Andrews Journal of International Relations. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/)