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dc.contributor.authorRollison, Jacob
dc.date.accessioned2017-09-01T11:03:00Z
dc.date.available2017-09-01T11:03:00Z
dc.date.issued2017-06-01
dc.identifier.citationRollison, J. (2017). In other words: towards a poetic theology of the spoken Word of God. Theology in Scotland, 24(1), 63-75en_US
dc.identifier.issn1465-2862en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://ojs.st-andrews.ac.uk/index.php/TIS/article/view/1519en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10023/11589
dc.description.abstractIn this paper, Jacob Rollison considers poetry in its various relations. Poetry raises questions regarding the relation of the world to a ‘beyond’, and the relation of representation to presence. The question poetry poses to theology is: if Jesus Christ is the Word, is this to be understood prosaically or poetically? as representation or presence? To probe this question Rollison draws on the work of the French theologian, sociologist and poet Jacques Ellul. For Ellul, poetry manifests the inseparability of form and content in communication, resisting Kierkegaard’s ironic stance by viewing the word as inseparable from the life of the one who speaks it. This points, in turn, to an inseparability of form and content in theology and the presence of God in his revelation. In contrast to the post-structuralist view, the world is not a text. For Ellul, the central medium is God’s speech, temporal and non-spatial in its essence. His poetics of speech is in turn based on the poetics of the Word of God. The form, then, of the Apocalypse in Revelation ‘allows the comprehension of its content’: theology is a poetic listening and responding to the Word, architecture in movement. The concerns of theology as poetry are not simply with poetic ideas but with the richer world of poetic existence.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherSt Mary's College, University of St Andrewsen_US
dc.relation.ispartofTheology in Scotlanden_US
dc.rightsCopyright (c) 2017 Jacob Rollison. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International Licence.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/*
dc.subjectTheologyen_US
dc.subjectPoetryen_US
dc.subjectProseen_US
dc.subjectJacques Ellulen_US
dc.subjectSøren Kierkeggarden_US
dc.subjectWorden_US
dc.subjectQoheleten_US
dc.subjectRevelationen_US
dc.subjectApocalypseen_US
dc.subjectPost-structuralismen_US
dc.subjectPostmodernismen_US
dc.subject.lccBR1.S3T5en_US
dc.subject.lcshTheology--Study and teaching--Scotlanden_US
dc.subject.lcshTheology, Doctrinal--Scotlanden_US
dc.titleIn other words: towards a poetic theology of the spoken Word of Goden_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.description.versionPublisher PDFen_US
dc.publicationstatusPublisheden_US
dc.statusPeer revieweden_US


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    Copyright (c) 2017 Jacob Rollison. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International Licence.
    Except where otherwise noted within the work, this item's license for re-use is described as Copyright (c) 2017 Jacob Rollison. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International Licence.