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dc.contributor.authorFlett, John G.
dc.date.accessioned2017-03-08T16:18:08Z
dc.date.available2017-03-08T16:18:08Z
dc.date.issued2014-06-01
dc.identifier.citationFlett, J. G. (2014). A theology of missio Dei. Theology in Scotland, 21(1), pp. 69-78.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1465-2862en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://ojs.st-andrews.ac.uk/index.php/TIS/article/view/1230en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10023/10420
dc.description.abstractIn the popular usage, the primary definition of missio Dei is that mission is not something the church does, but God does. John Flett follows this with two further affirmations: as God is missionary, so the community which worships Him is missionary; and secondly that mission is set within an eschatological perspective and becomes the determining factor ‘between the times’. This article aims to correct the popular definition of the term by drawing on the work of Karl Barth, arguing that reconciliation across boundaries lies at the heart of the missio Dei.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherSt Mary's College, University of St Andrewsen_US
dc.relation.ispartofTheology in Scotlanden_US
dc.rightsThis is an open access article published in Theology in Scotland. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/)en_US
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/*
dc.subjectMissionen_US
dc.subjectMission Deien_US
dc.subjectKarl Barthen_US
dc.subjectCommunityen_US
dc.subject.lccBR1.S3T5en_US
dc.subject.lcshTheology--Study and teaching--Scotlanden_US
dc.subject.lcshTheology, Doctrinal--Scotlanden_US
dc.titleA theology of missio Deien_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.description.versionPublisher PDFen_US
dc.publicationstatusPublisheden_US
dc.statusPeer revieweden_US


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    This is an open access article published in Theology in Scotland. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/)
    Except where otherwise noted within the work, this item's license for re-use is described as This is an open access article published in Theology in Scotland. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/)