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dc.contributor.authorCooke, Sophia C.
dc.contributor.authorBalmford, Andrew
dc.contributor.authorDonald, Paul F.
dc.contributor.authorNewson, Stuart E.
dc.contributor.authorJohnston, Alison
dc.date.accessioned2021-11-25T16:30:08Z
dc.date.available2021-11-25T16:30:08Z
dc.date.issued2020-07-07
dc.identifier.citationCooke , S C , Balmford , A , Donald , P F , Newson , S E & Johnston , A 2020 , ' Roads as a contributor to landscape-scale variation in bird communities ' , Nature Communications , vol. 11 , 3125 . https://doi.org/10.1038/s41467-020-16899-xen
dc.identifier.issn2041-1723
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 276798184
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: 8e00407d-ee12-4428-b0c5-a7b475357d54
dc.identifier.otherWOS: 000548307200001
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 85087547861
dc.identifier.otherORCID: /0000-0001-8221-013X/work/103866006
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10023/24404
dc.descriptionFunding: The BBS is jointly funded by the BTO, JNCC and RSPB. Stuart Newson is supported by the BTO’s Young Scientists’ Programme. Sophia C. Cooke is funded by the Natural Environment Research Council (RG81247).en
dc.description.abstractRoads and their traffic can affect wildlife over large areas and, in regions with dense road networks, may influence a high proportion of the ecological landscape. We assess the abundance of 75 bird species in relation to roads across Great Britain. Of these, 77% vary significantly in abundance with increasing road exposure, just over half negatively so. The effect distances of these negative associations average 700m from a road, covering over 70% of Great Britain and over 40% of the total area of terrestrial protected sites. Species with smaller national populations generally have lower relative abundance with increasing road exposure, whereas the opposite is true for more common species. Smaller-bodied and migratory species are also more negatively associated with road exposure. By creating environmental conditions that benefit generally common species at the expense of others, road networks may echo other anthropogenic disturbances in bringing about large-scale simplification of avian communities.
dc.format.extent10
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofNature Communicationsen
dc.rightsCopyright © The Author(s) 2020. This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder.en
dc.subjectQA Mathematicsen
dc.subjectQH301 Biologyen
dc.subjectDASen
dc.subject.lccQAen
dc.subject.lccQH301en
dc.titleRoads as a contributor to landscape-scale variation in bird communitiesen
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.description.versionPublisher PDFen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews.Statisticsen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1038/s41467-020-16899-x
dc.description.statusPeer revieweden


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