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dc.contributor.authorLymperopoulou, Kitty
dc.contributor.authorFinney, Nissa
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-27T15:30:09Z
dc.date.available2017-07-27T15:30:09Z
dc.date.issued2017-08-01
dc.identifier.citationLymperopoulou , K & Finney , N 2017 , ' Socio-spatial factors associated with ethnic inequalities in districts of England and Wales, 2001–2011 ' , Urban Studies , vol. 54 , no. 11 , pp. 2540-2560 . https://doi.org/10.1177/0042098016653725en
dc.identifier.issn0042-0980
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 245468640
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: 311da8c0-cda7-4fdc-a2a6-1cfd60f37171
dc.identifier.otherRIS: urn:25024E4F8F172DB62732280E77EF2948
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 85025808271
dc.identifier.otherWOS: 000406539700007
dc.identifier.otherORCID: /0000-0001-6602-9920/work/65014576
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10023/11310
dc.description.abstractThis paper explores the changing geography of ethnic inequality in England and Wales drawing on data from the 2001 and 2011 censuses. Specifically, we use the 2011 Office for National Statistics (ONS) area classification to examine how ethnic inequalities within local areas with different demographic and socio-economic characteristics have changed over time. Local ethnic inequalities are examined through a set of indicators which capture differences in housing, health, employment and education between ethnic minority groups and the White British in local authority districts in England and Wales. The results suggest that ethnic inequalities are widespread and persistent, and highlight the different ways in which inequalities manifest for particular ethnic groups in different localities. Ethnic inequality in housing and employment is severe for most ethnic minority groups, particularly in large urban areas that have been traditional settlement areas for ethnic minorities. However, inequalities increased most over the decade 2001–2011 in rural and coastal areas that have low ethnic diversity levels and small ethnic minority populations. The paper considers these findings in relation to theories of service provision and racism, ethnic density, and immigrant adaptation.
dc.format.extent21
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofUrban Studiesen
dc.rights© Urban Studies Journal Limited 2016. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License (http://www.creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/) which permits any use, reproduction and distribution of the work without further permission provided the original work is attributed as specified on the SAGE and Open Access page (https://us.sagepub.com/en-us/nam/open-access-at-sage).en
dc.subjectArea classificationen
dc.subjectEthnic geographiesen
dc.subjectEthnic inequalitiesen
dc.subjectIntegrationen
dc.subjectUK Censusen
dc.subjectGF Human ecology. Anthropogeographyen
dc.subjectHT Communities. Classes. Racesen
dc.subject3rd-NDASen
dc.subject.lccGFen
dc.subject.lccHTen
dc.titleSocio-spatial factors associated with ethnic inequalities in districts of England and Wales, 2001–2011en
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.description.versionPublisher PDFen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews.Geography & Sustainable Developmenten
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of St Andrews.Centre for Minorities Research (CMR)en
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1177/0042098016653725
dc.description.statusPeer revieweden


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