Now showing items 1-7 of 7

  • Contractarianism as a Political Morality 

    Sachs, Benjamin Alan (2016-06-02) - Journal article
    Contractarianism initially made its mark, in the seventeenth century, as a sort of theory of everything in ethics. But gradually philosophers became convinced that there were resources available outside contractarianism ...
  • Direct moral grounding and the legal model of moral normativity 

    Sachs, Benjamin Alan (2015-04) - Journal article
    Whereas most moral philosophers believe that the facts as to what we’re morally required to do are grounded by the facts about our moral reasons, which in turn are grounded by non-normative facts, I propose that moral ...
  • Liberal trusteeship : preparatory work for an epistemic defence of non-egalitarian liberalism 

    Dagkas-Tsoukalas, Vladimiros (University of St Andrews, 2017-06-22) - Thesis
    This thesis examines some epistemic defences of democracy put forward by David Estlund, Michael Fuerstein, Cheryl Misak, and Fabienne Peter, as well as a critique of democracy raised by Jason Brennan. It then develops an ...
  • Morality, adapted 

    Sachs, Benjamin Alan (2010) - Journal article
    Over the last few decades, scientists have been busy debunking the myth that nonhuman animals relate to each other in a primarily competitive, aggressive way. What they have found is that many species of animal, including ...
  • Non-consequentialist theories of animal ethics 

    Sachs, Benjamin Alan (2015-10) - Journal article
  • Two kinds of rule regulating human subjects research 

    Sachs, Benjamin Alan (2015) - Journal article
    Alan Wertheimer argues that before we promulgate some rule regarding the conduct of research on human subjects we ethically ought to consider the consequences of the rule being followed. This ethical requirement has an ...
  • Why coercion is wrong when it’s wrong 

    Sachs, Benjamin Alan (2013) - Journal article
    It is usually thought that wrongful acts of threat-involving coercion are wrong because they involve a violation of the freedom or autonomy of the targets of those acts. I argue here that this cannot possibly be right, and ...