Now showing items 1-20 of 407

  • Abstract knowledge in the broken-string problem : evidence from nonhuman primates and pre-schoolers 

    Mayer, Carolina Patricia; Call, Josep; Albiach-Serrano, Anna; Visalberghi, Elisabetta; Sabbatini, Gloria; Seed, Amanda Madeleine (2014-10-01) - Journal article
    There is still large controversy about whether abstract knowledge of physical problems is uniquely human. We presented 9 capuchin monkeys, 6 bonobos, 6 chimpanzees and 48 children with two versions of a broken-string ...
  • Acting in solidarity: testing an extended dual-pathway model of collective action by bystander group members 

    Saab, Rim; Tausch, Nicole; Spears, Russell; Cheung, Wing (2015-09) - Journal article
    We examined predictors of collective action among bystander group members in solidarity with a disadvantaged group by extending the dual pathway model of collective action, which proposes one efficacy-based and one ...
  • Active drumming experience increases infants' sensitivity to audiovisual synchrony during observed drumming actions 

    Gerson, Sarah; Schiavio, Andrea; Timmers, Renee; Hunnius, Sabine (2015-06-25) - Journal article
    In the current study, we examined the role of active experience on sensitivity to multisensory synchrony in six-month-old infants in a musical context. In the first of two experiments, we trained infants to produce a novel ...
  • Adaptation improves face trustworthiness discrimination 

    Keefe, Bruce D; Dzhelyova, Milena Petrova; Perrett, David I; Barraclough, Nick Edward (2013-06-19) - Journal article
    Adaptation to facial characteristics, such as gender and viewpoint, has been shown to both bias our perception of faces and improve facial discrimination. In this study, we examined whether adapting to two levels of face ...
  • Adaptation to facial trustworthiness is different in female and male observers 

    Wincenciak, Joanna; Dzhelyova, Milena; Perrett, David I.; Barraclough, Nick E. (2013-07-19) - Journal article
    Face adaptation paradigms have been used extensively to investigate the mechanisms underlying the processing of several different facial characteristics including face shape, identity, view and emotional expression. ...
  • Adjusting foraging strategies : a comparison of rural and urban common mynas (Acridotheres tristis) 

    Federspiel, Ira G.; Garland, Alexis; Guez, David; Bugynar, Thomas; Healy, Susan D.; Güntürkün, Onur; Griffin, Andrea S. (2017-01) - Journal article
    Establishment in urbanized environments is associated with changes in physiology, behaviour, and problem-solving. We compared the speed of learning in urban and rural female common mynas, Acridotheres tristis, using a ...
  • Aesthetic and incentive salience of cute infant faces : studies of observer sex, oral contraception and menstrual cycle 

    Sprengelmeyer, Reiner; Lewis, Jennifer; Hahn, Amanda; Perrett, David I. (2013-05-29) - Journal article
    Infant cuteness can influence adult-infant interaction and has been shown to activate reward centres in the brain. In a previous study, we found men and women to be differentially sensitive to small differences in infant ...
  • African elephants (Loxodonta africana) recognize visual attention from face and body orientation 

    Smet, Ann Farai; Byrne, Richard William (2014-07-10) - Journal article
    How do animals determine when others are able and disposed to receive their communicative signals? In particular, it is futile to make a silent gesture when the intended audience cannot see it. Some non-human primates use ...
  • African elephants can use human pointing cues to find hidden food 

    Smet, Ann Farai; Byrne, Richard William (2013-10-21) - Journal article
    How animals gain information from attending to the behavior of others has been widely studied, driven partly by the importance of referential pointing in human cognitive development [1, 2, 3 and 4], but species differences ...
  • African perceptions of female attractiveness 

    Coetzee, Vinet; Faerber, Stella J; Greeff, Jaco M; Lefevre, Carmen Emilia; Re, Daniel; Perrett, David Ian (2012-10-29) - Journal article
    Little is known about mate choice preferences outside Western, educated, industrialised, rich and democratic societies, even though these Western populations may be particularly unrepresentative of human populations. To ...
  • Age-dependent cognitive inflexibility in great apes 

    Marin Manrique, Hector; Call, Josep (2015-04) - Journal article
    The ability to suppress and/or change behaviour on the basis of negative feedback, often conceptualized as cognitive flexibility, has rarely been investigated in nonhuman great apes across a broad age range. In this study, ...
  • Aggressor or protector? Experiences and perceptions of violence predict preferences for masculinity 

    Borras Guevara, Martha Lucia; Batres, Carlota; Perrett, David I. (2017-07) - Journal article
    Women’s preferences for masculine male partners have been explained in terms of heritable health. The evidence between masculinity and health, however, is controversial and therefore, alternative explanations for masculinity ...
  • Apes have culture but may not know that they do 

    Gruber, Thibaud; Zuberbuehler, Klaus; Clement, Fabrice; van Schaik, Carel (2015-02-06) - Journal article
    There is good evidence that some ape behaviors can be transmitted socially and that this can lead to group-specific traditions. However, many consider animal traditions, including those in great apes, to be fundamentally ...
  • Apes in the Anthropocene : flexibility and survival 

    Hockings, Kimberley J.; McLennan, Matthew R.; Carvalho, Susana; Ancrenaz, Marc; Bobe, René; Byrne, R.W.; Dunbar, Robin I.M.; Matsuzawa, Tetsuro; McGrew, William C.; Williamson, Elizabeth A.; Wilson, Michael L.; Wood, Bernard; Wrangham, Richard W.; Hill, Catherine M. (2015-04) - Journal article
    We are in a new epoch, the Anthropocene, and research into our closest living relatives, the great apes, must keep pace with the rate that our species is driving change. While a goal of many studies is to understand how ...
  • Applying behavioural science to issues of public health : the case for social norms intervention 

    Ganz, Gary; Neville, Fergus G.; Ward, Catherine L. (2017-05-30) - Journal article
    In the effort to address behavioural risk factors – which contribute significantly to the global burden of disease – there is a growing movement in public health towards the use of interventions informed by behavioural ...
  • Applying evolutionary theory to human behaviour: past differences and current debates 

    Brown, Gillian Ruth; Richerson, Peter (2014-07) - Journal article
    Interpretation biases, in which ambiguous information is interpreted negatively, have been hypothesized to place adolescent females at greater risk of developing anxiety and mood disorders than same-aged males. We tested ...
  • Are apes essentialists? Scope and limits of psychological essentialism in great apes 

    Cacchione, Trix; Hrubesch, Christine; Call, Josep; Rakoczy, Hannes (2016-09) - Journal article
    Human reasoning is characterized by psychological essentialism (Gelman, 2003): when reasoning about objects we distinguish between deep essential properties defining the object’s kind and identity, and merely superficial ...
  • Autobiographical memory specificity in response to verbal and pictorial cues in clinical depression 

    Ridout, Nathan; Dritschel, Barbara; Matthews, Keith; O'Carroll, Ronan (2016-06-01) - Journal article
    Background Depressed individuals have been consistently shown to exhibit problems in accessing specific memories of events from their past and instead tend to retrieve categorical summaries of events. The majority of studies ...
  • Automated face detection for occurrence and occupancy estimation in chimpanzees 

    Crunchant, Anne-Sophie; Egerer, Monika; Loos, Alexander; Burghardt, Tilo; Zuberbühler, Klaus; Corogenes, Katherine; Leinert, Vera; Kulik, Lars; Kühl, Hjalmar S. (2017-03) - Journal article
    Surveying endangered species is necessary to evaluate conservation effectiveness. Camera trapping and biometric computer vision are recent technological advances. They have impacted on the methods applicable to field surveys ...
  • The awareness of novelty for strangely familiar words : a laboratory analogue of the déjà vu experience 

    Urquhart, Josephine; O'Connor, Akira Robert (2014-11-11) - Journal article
    Déjà vu is a nebulous memory experience defined by a clash between evaluations of familiarity and novelty for the same stimulus. We sought to generate it in the laboratory by pairing a DRM recognition task, which generates ...