Now showing items 1-20 of 235

  • Abstract knowledge in the broken-string problem : evidence from nonhuman primates and pre-schoolers 

    Mayer, Carolina Patricia; Call, Josep; Albiach-Serrano, Anna; Visalberghi, Elisabetta; Sabbatini, Gloria; Seed, Amanda Madeleine (2014-10-01) - Journal article
    There is still large controversy about whether abstract knowledge of physical problems is uniquely human. We presented 9 capuchin monkeys, 6 bonobos, 6 chimpanzees and 48 children with two versions of a broken-string ...
  • Active drumming experience increases infants' sensitivity to audiovisual synchrony during observed drumming actions 

    Gerson, Sarah; Schiavio, Andrea; Timmers, Renee; Hunnius, Sabine (2015-06-25) - Journal article
    In the current study, we examined the role of active experience on sensitivity to multisensory synchrony in six-month-old infants in a musical context. In the first of two experiments, we trained infants to produce a novel ...
  • Adaptation improves face trustworthiness discrimination 

    Keefe, Bruce D; Dzhelyova, Milena Petrova; Perrett, David I; Barraclough, Nick Edward (2013-06-19) - Journal article
    Adaptation to facial characteristics, such as gender and viewpoint, has been shown to both bias our perception of faces and improve facial discrimination. In this study, we examined whether adapting to two levels of face ...
  • Adaptation to facial trustworthiness is different in female and male observers 

    Wincenciak, Joanna; Dzhelyova, Milena; Perrett, David I.; Barraclough, Nick E. (2013-07-19) - Journal article
    Face adaptation paradigms have been used extensively to investigate the mechanisms underlying the processing of several different facial characteristics including face shape, identity, view and emotional expression. ...
  • Aesthetic and incentive salience of cute infant faces : studies of observer sex, oral contraception and menstrual cycle 

    Sprengelmeyer, Reiner; Lewis, Jennifer; Hahn, Amanda; Perrett, David I. (2013-05-29) - Journal article
    Infant cuteness can influence adult-infant interaction and has been shown to activate reward centres in the brain. In a previous study, we found men and women to be differentially sensitive to small differences in infant ...
  • African elephants (Loxodonta africana) recognize visual attention from face and body orientation 

    Smet, Ann Farai; Byrne, Richard William (2014-07-10) - Journal article
    How do animals determine when others are able and disposed to receive their communicative signals? In particular, it is futile to make a silent gesture when the intended audience cannot see it. Some non-human primates use ...
  • African elephants can use human pointing cues to find hidden food 

    Smet, Ann Farai; Byrne, Richard William (2013-10-21) - Journal article
    How animals gain information from attending to the behavior of others has been widely studied, driven partly by the importance of referential pointing in human cognitive development [1, 2, 3 and 4], but species differences ...
  • African perceptions of female attractiveness 

    Coetzee, Vinet; Faerber, Stella J; Greeff, Jaco M; Lefevre, Carmen Emilia; Re, Daniel; Perrett, David Ian (2012-10-29) - Journal article
    Little is known about mate choice preferences outside Western, educated, industrialised, rich and democratic societies, even though these Western populations may be particularly unrepresentative of human populations. To ...
  • Age-dependent cognitive inflexibility in great apes 

    Marin Manrique, Hector; Call, Josep (2015-04) - Journal article
    The ability to suppress and/or change behaviour on the basis of negative feedback, often conceptualized as cognitive flexibility, has rarely been investigated in nonhuman great apes across a broad age range. In this study, ...
  • Apes have culture but may not know that they do 

    Gruber, Thibaud; Zuberbuehler, Klaus; Clement, Fabrice; van Schaik, Carel (2015-02-06) - Journal article
    There is good evidence that some ape behaviors can be transmitted socially and that this can lead to group-specific traditions. However, many consider animal traditions, including those in great apes, to be fundamentally ...
  • Apes in the Anthropocene : flexibility and survival 

    Hockings, Kimberley J.; McLennan, Matthew R.; Carvalho, Susana; Ancrenaz, Marc; Bobe, René; Byrne, R.W.; Dunbar, Robin I.M.; Matsuzawa, Tetsuro; McGrew, William C.; Williamson, Elizabeth A.; Wilson, Michael L.; Wood, Bernard; Wrangham, Richard W.; Hill, Catherine M. (2015-04) - Journal article
    We are in a new epoch, the Anthropocene, and research into our closest living relatives, the great apes, must keep pace with the rate that our species is driving change. While a goal of many studies is to understand how ...
  • Applying evolutionary theory to human behaviour: past differences and current debates 

    Brown, Gillian Ruth; Richerson, Peter (2014-07) - Journal article
    Interpretation biases, in which ambiguous information is interpreted negatively, have been hypothesized to place adolescent females at greater risk of developing anxiety and mood disorders than same-aged males. We tested ...
  • The awareness of novelty for strangely familiar words : a laboratory analogue of the déjà vu experience 

    Urquhart, Josephine; O'Connor, Akira Robert (2014-11-11) - Journal article
    Déjà vu is a nebulous memory experience defined by a clash between evaluations of familiarity and novelty for the same stimulus. We sought to generate it in the laboratory by pairing a DRM recognition task, which generates ...
  • Begging, stealing, and offering : food transfer in nonhuman primates 

    Brown, Gillian Ruth; Almond, REA; van Bergen, Y (2004-12) - Journal article
  • Behavioural health consultants in integrated primary care teams : a model for future care 

    Dale, Hannah; Lee, Alyssa (2016-07-29) - Journal article
    Background: Significant challenges exist within primary care services in the United Kingdom (UK). These include meeting current demand, financial pressures, an aging population and an increase in multi-morbidity. Psychological ...
  • A behaviourally related developmental switch in nitrergic modulation of locomotor rhythmogenesis in larval Xenopus tadpoles 

    Currie, Stephen Paul; Combes, Denis; Scott, Nicholas William; Simmers, John; Sillar, Keith Thomas (2016-03-18) - Journal article
    Locomotor control requires functional flexibility to support an animal’s full behavioural repertoire. This flexibility is partly endowed by neuromodulators, allowing neural networks to generate a range of motor output ...
  • Beyond prevalence to process : the role of self and identity in medical student well-being 

    Mavor, Ken; McNeill, Kathleen G.; Anderson, Katrina; Kerr, Annelise; O'Reilly, Erin; Platow, Michael J (2014-04) - Journal article
    Context Problematic stress levels among medical students have been well established. This stress can lead to depression, suicidal ideation, substance abuse, burnout and cynicism, having a negative effect on students and ...
  • Blinded by beauty: attractiveness bias and accurate perceptions of academic performance 

    Talamas, Sean; Mavor, Kenneth Ian; Perrett, David Ian (2016-02-17) - Journal article
    Despite the old adage not to ‘judge a book by its cover’, facial cues often guide first impressions and these first impressions guide our decisions. Literature suggests there are valid facial cues that assist us in assessing ...
  • Bonobos (Pan paniscus) vocally protest against violations of social expectations 

    Clay, Susanna Elizabeth Valerie; Ravaux, Lucie; de Waal, Frans B. M.; Zuberbuhler, Klaus (2016-02) - Journal article
    Research has shown that great apes possess certain expectations about social regularities and both perceive and act according to social rules within their group. During natural and experimentally induced contexts, such as ...
  • Bonobos modify communication signals according to recipient familiarity 

    Genty, Emilie; Neumann, Christof; Zuberbuehler, Klaus (2015-11-10) - Journal article
    Human and nonhuman primate communication differs in various ways. In particular, humans base communicative efforts on mutual knowledge and conventions shared between interlocutors. In this study, we experimentally tested ...