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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10023/492
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Title: Some aspects of ion motion in liquid helium : the study of mobility discontinuities in superfluid helium (and liquid nitrogen), and the influence of grids on the transmission of an ion beam
Authors: Doake, Christopher S. M.
Supervisors: Gribbon, P. W. F.
Issue Date: 1972
Abstract: We were unable to verify the existence of ion mobility discontinuities in either superfluid helium at 1 K or liquid nitrogen. The velocity-field dependence in helium was described by an increased interaction with the normal fluid, due to an increase in the roton number density close to the ion surface. The mobility results in nitrogen were interpreted as being due to liquid motion, following a theory by Kopylov. The D.C. results showed that the effect of a grid on the transmission of an ion beam could be described by a field dependent grid transmission coefficient, independent of the ion velocity. The vortex ring transmission through a grid was a complex function of vorticity being captured by the grid, the capture and escape probabilities of the bare ions by vorticity, and the onset for vorticity propagating throughout the ion cell.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10023/492
Type: Thesis
Publisher: University of St Andrews
Appears in Collections:Physics & Astronomy Theses



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