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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10023/339
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Title: Versatile high resolution dispersion measurements in semiconductor photonic nanostructures using ultrashort pulses
Authors: Bell, Matthew Richard
Supervisors: Miller, Alan
Keywords: Ultrashort
Optical pulses
Dispersion
Photonic
Issue Date: 19-Jun-2007
Abstract: This thesis describes the process of developing a robust phase measurement technique with which to analyse semiconductor based devices intended for use in optoelectronic/all optical networks. The devices measured are prospective dispersion compensators, based either on planar photonic crystal waveguides or coupled microcavities connected by ridge waveguide. The technique was validated by measuring the phase transfer function of a Fabry Perot etalon. This demonstrated that even when detecting low optical powers (sub μW), accurate measurement of phase could quickly be carried out over a significant spectral range (~10nm). Comparison of experimental data taken from the prospective dispersion compensators with theory showed excellent agreement, which provided qualitative (cavity spacing and reflectivity) and quantitative (loss) measures of device performance. The phase measurement technique has been designed to be capable of measuring other classes of device also, including active devices such as semiconductor optical amplifiers. This suggests the phase measurement technique may be valuable in analysing the variation of dispersion as a function of applied bias, peak power or temperature for a variety of devices.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10023/339
Type: Thesis
Publisher: University of St Andrews
Appears in Collections:Physics & Astronomy Theses



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