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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10023/3264
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HaslamReicher2012pbio1001426NatureofConformity.pdf77.55 kBAdobe PDFView/Open
Title: Contesting the “nature” of conformity : what Milgram and Zimbardo's studies really show
Authors: Haslam, Alexander
Reicher, Stephen David
Keywords: BF Psychology
Issue Date: 20-Nov-2012
Citation: Haslam , A & Reicher , S D 2012 , ' Contesting the “nature” of conformity : what Milgram and Zimbardo's studies really show ' PLoS Biology , vol 10 , no. 11 , e1001426 .
Abstract: Understanding of the psychology of tyranny is dominated by classic studies from the 1960s and 1970s: Milgram's research on obedience to authority and Zimbardo's Stanford Prison Experiment. Supporting popular notions of the banality of evil, this research has been taken to show that people conform passively and unthinkingly to both the instructions and the roles that authorities provide, however malevolent these may be. Recently, though, this consensus has been challenged by empirical work informed by social identity theorizing. This suggests that individuals' willingness to follow authorities is conditional on identification with the authority in question and an associated belief that the authority is right.
Version: Publisher PDF
Status: Peer reviewed
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10023/3264
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pbio.1001426
ISSN: 1544-9173
Type: Journal article
Rights: © 2012 Haslam, Reicher. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
Appears in Collections:Psychology & Neuroscience Research
University of St Andrews Research



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