Research@StAndrews
 
The University of St Andrews

Research@StAndrews:FullText >
University of St Andrews Research >
University of St Andrews Research >
University of St Andrews Research >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10023/3239
This item has been viewed 56 times in the last year. View Statistics

Files in This Item:

File Description SizeFormat
Chaotic_Narrative_Dillon_1.pdf372.15 kBAdobe PDFView/Open
Title: Chaotic narrative : complexity, causality, time and autopoiesis in David Mitchell’s Ghostwritten
Authors: Dillon, Sarah Joanne
Keywords: David Mitchell
Ghostwritten
Interconnection
Science
Autopoiesis
H.D.
Chaos Theory
PN0080 Criticism
Issue Date: 10-Mar-2011
Citation: Dillon , S J 2011 , ' Chaotic narrative : complexity, causality, time and autopoiesis in David Mitchell’s Ghostwritten ' Critique: Studies in Contemporary Fiction , vol 52 , no. 2 , pp. 135-162 .
Abstract: David Mitchell is one of Britain’s foremost contemporary writers who is only just becoming the subject of academic attention. Focusing on his first novel, Ghostwritten (1999), this essay argues that the science of complexity provides a language with which to account for the novel’s complex interconnecting structure. The novel is defined as an autopoietic system according to the theories of Maturana and Varela and its engagement with the issues of causality and time explored in relation to the work of Ilya Prigogine. The paper concludes that Ghostwritten is a complex narrative system that responds to the intimate connection between the macroscopic and the microscopic in the contemporary world.
Version: Postprint
Status: Peer reviewed
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10023/3239
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00111610903380170
ISSN: 0011-1619
Type: Journal article
Rights: This is an Author's Accepted Manuscript of an article published as ‘Chaotic Narrative: Complexity, Causality, Time and Autopoiesis in David Mitchell’s Ghostwritten’, Critique 52:2 (2011), 135-62 [copyright Taylor & Francis], available online at: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/00111610903380170
Appears in Collections:English Research
University of St Andrews Research



This item is protected by original copyright

Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

 

DSpace Software Copyright © 2002-2012  Duraspace - Feedback
For help contact: Digital-Repository@st-andrews.ac.uk | Copyright for this page belongs to St Andrews University Library | Terms and Conditions (Cookies)